Jump to content

Guessing game....Multi bar composite blade


Richard Furrer
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello All,

So I welded up this blade last weekend and just rough ground it..then a light etch.

It is special to me for one reason.....can you guess why?

 

It is a twisted and straight layer seven bar construction....a pair of twists on each side...so nothing real special in its construction. We have all seen a pattern like this before.

And no..the recent apogee moon has no relevance.

 

It is 14" long and 2 5/8 wide

Ric

C64:C61 damascus2012.jpeg

C64:C61 damascus2012 2.jpeg

Edited by Richard Furrer

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Were all the layers your own crucible steel?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

some kinda stainless steel?

 

Well...that did not take long.....yes indeed...stainless steels they are.

An ALL stainless steel five bar with cutting edge blade.

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now that is something. All stainless, perfect welds with a great etch when you finshed.

 

Congrats

 

chuck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ric,

 

First post you said seven bar construction, then on post five you said five bar with a "cutting edge." So is the edge carbon steel?

 

If so, even more impressive.

 

I've welded stainless (440c) to carbon (1095) and it was a pain. I ended up making a small spearhead out of it instead of a knife blade because it wanted to shear so badly. I learned it was possible from JPH, but I also learned I wasn't as good as JPH, so . . .

 

You are a Jedi Master at the forge, man.

 

Most hearty cheers,

 

--Dave

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are a Jedi Master at the forge, man.

 

Yes, he is. B)

 

I like it indeed! I'm not going to ask how you did it, because I know I couldn't replicate the conditions with what I've got, most importantly the part Dave mentioned. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ric,

 

First post you said seven bar construction, then on post five you said five bar with a "cutting edge." So is the edge carbon steel?

 

If so, even more impressive.

 

I've welded stainless (440c) to carbon (1095) and it was a pain. I ended up making a small spearhead out of it instead of a knife blade because it wanted to shear so badly. I learned it was possible from JPH, but I also learned I wasn't as good as JPH, so . . .

 

You are a Jedi Master at the forge, man.

 

Most hearty cheers,

 

--Dave

 

Dave the initial billet has seven layers. This "feeder billet" was used to make the straight grain spine. Then portions were counter twisted...two left and two right.

The final billet is as follows:

seven layer spine with two pair of counter twist bars then a cutting edge. I like to have them paired so they are not the same direction from side to side. An observant person will see it is four bars rather than just two.

So just to add to the confusion..there are six pieces welded in the final billet. All are stainless steel.

C64:C61 damascus2012 cross section.jpeg

 

More clear now?

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ric.

 

Thats nice one, even im not that much stainless orinted

 

Are we talking about all Martensitic stainless steel grades?

 

Air or oil quenst?

 

Looking frwd to how you desing handel and others, looks nice in over all.

 

BR

Niko

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Extreme sushi Knife !!

 

you are in the water, the tuna is in the water, your (stainless steel) herring bone knife is in the water. swish-flash- swish ............Sushi!

 

 

ahem . good job ric..

forging soul in to steel

 

owenbush.co.uk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More clear now?

Very cool. I thought that something like that was happening when I did not see the twists changing direction when flipping sides :-)

 

Niels.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Grosses Kino"

as we say here, regards!!!

good and hard work, Ric,

but I will stay in more simple "rusty stuff"

 

pls show us the rest of the show

Jokke

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mr. Furrer:

 

That is some nice clean welding. SS can be a real PITA to do outside of a can ..but it can be done.. The venerable Cleston Sinyard and I pretty much figured out a way to do it at about the same time...

 

"I've welded stainless (440c) to carbon (1095) and it was a pain. I ended up making a small spearhead out of it instead of a knife blade because it wanted to shear so badly. I learned it was possible from JPH, but I also learned I wasn't as good as JPH, so . . ."

 

Dave: I just started doing SS welding cause no one told me I couldn't....sure it is a PITA but it is a neat thing to do...

 

Way back when Terry LaBorde asked me to show him how to forge weld SS and he started making patterned SS barstock..but he couldn't even give it away back in the 1970's/early 1980's and he simply went out of the SS barstoick business...sad that....

Geeze I am getting a bit long in the tooth...

 

JPH

If you wish to know the price of freedom..Visit a Veteran's Hospital...I am humbled by their sacrifice... 

Why is it when the Mighty Thor throws his hammer he is dispensing Justice and fighting Evil..BUT..when I throw my hammer I wind up in a mandatory 16 week anger management course??</p>

I came into this world naked, screaming and covered in someone else's blood...I have no problem going out the same way...

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Way back when Terry LaBorde asked me to show him how to forge weld SS and he started making patterned SS barstock..but he couldn't even give it away back in the 1970's/early 1980's and he simply went out of the SS barstoick business...sad that....

Geeze I am getting a bit long in the tooth...

 

JPH

I think that's because when all is said and done, whether you forge, grind or press your steel stock into blade form, you still have heat-treating to do and let's face it, most smiths don't have the setup to properly do stainless steel alloys. Not to mention that most stainless alloys are not really suited for the monster blades, i.e., swords, really huge bowies, that many of us love making.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that's because when all is said and done, whether you forge, grind or press your steel stock into blade form, you still have heat-treating to do and let's face it, most smiths don't have the setup to properly do stainless steel alloys. Not to mention that most stainless alloys are not really suited for the monster blades, i.e., swords, really huge bowies, that many of us love making.

 

I would say most smiths improperly heat treat carbon steel...so... I must also agree with your assessment of stainless steels.

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim,

Cleston welded up all manner of things...Larry Harley has a story of a car part which Cleston wadded up into a billet...it was a small shinny dot in the blade.

Given the right conditions you can stick about anything together...forging, ductility of the weld and heat treatment are other issues.

 

I believe Daryl Meier has done many hundreds of pounds of stainless to carbon steel welds...many many years ago.

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...