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13th century German sword


J. Helmes

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They are tight on the back, and don't move at all. The way you inset the blade makes it near impossible to get a no-gap fit, and historically that was not a big deal at all. The whole no-gap thing is a very modern conceit that prior to around the middle of the 20th century folks just didn't care about. In other words, that's just the way it's always been done. B) If you want to make a historically accurate sword (or most types of knife, for that matter), there will be a little gap between the guard and the sides of the blade.

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Just damn stunning, you know it :D

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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I did the inlay prior to heat treat. :)

 

 

Cool, did you have any trouble with the wire expanding and popping out? I would have thought the expansion rate for the bronze would be different enough from the steel that it would force the wire out. I have a whole new thing to explore now. :)

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Cool, did you have any trouble with the wire expanding and popping out? I would have thought the expansion rate for the bronze would be different enough from the steel that it would force the wire out. I have a whole new thing to explore now. :)

 

 

No problems with expansion. If the wire is popping out then your chanels probably aren't cut properly.

 

Jeff

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They are tight on the back, and don't move at all. The way you inset the blade makes it near impossible to get a no-gap fit, and historically that was not a big deal at all. The whole no-gap thing is a very modern conceit that prior to around the middle of the 20th century folks just didn't care about. In other words, that's just the way it's always been done. B) If you want to make a historically accurate sword (or most types of knife, for that matter), there will be a little gap between the guard and the sides of the blade.

Not only that, historically guards were never, ever, soldered, brazed, welded or whatever. While not necessarilly "take-down", like Japanese swords, they could be dismounted fairly eaasilly by craftsmen with the appropriate tools for repairs, replacement of grips, guards or pommels, whether to repair damage or simply fit a different set of mounts as styles changed.

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