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The "Morph" and a little story about it


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A few months ago a new maker asked if I could give him a few pointers on grinding blades. He made the trip across the Georgia border (Green Card in order) and brought with him a couple of blanks that he had designed and had profiled.

 

My first thoughts were that the simple drop point design was not bad for his first. I thought the material was a bit thick (somewhere around 3/16”) for such a short knife. To me, the blade height was a tad tall, and the handle just didn’t feel quite right in my hand. Overall, it was not a bad design, but it just wasn’t my “cuppa tea”.

 

We spent the day grinding and at the end of the day, he gifted me the blade that I had ground. Later, I heat treated it, sharpened it, and cut all kinds of stuff with it. I was fairly impressed with the edge retention. I still didn’t put handles on it ‘cause it just wasn’t my style blade.

 

Fast forward to being hyped up and inspired after the Blade Show. I ground the drop point into something a little different, changed the handle profile slightly, ground the mill scale off of the ricasso area, repositioned the handle holes by cutting a rectangular window in the handle, and tapered the tang. I did all this while the blade was still razor sharp. (Yea, I know, that wasn’t the brightest idea).

 

Here is the result. I must say, it feels quite nice in my hand.

 

S-35VN Steel

Full distal taper on the blade with tapered tang

Linen Micarta scales with black liners

Hammer domed nickel silver pins

OAL – 7”

Blade Tip-to-Handle – 3 ¼”

 

S35VN.jpg

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Robert! :D Good to see you back. B)

 

That looks like a beefier Schrade Sharpfinger skinner, kinda sorta...

 

I must confess a weakness for the natural linen micarta, it reminds me of the 1980s when I was first made aware of the idea that one could actually MAKE a knife, not just buy one.

 

When did you move on to those high-tech Crucible stainless steels? ;)

 

Nice job on the butterfly sheath. too. Did you ever see Kenny Rowe do one of those? Your stitching is first class, especially with that tooling around the welt. Did you stitch then tool, or tool then stitch? Inquiring minds and so on. :lol:

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When did you move on to those high-tech Crucible stainless steels? ;)

 

Alan, My old shoulders are trying to go out on me, so I can't forge as much as I would like. I have had numerous requests for stainless, so I bought myself an Evenheat oven last year and have been using quite a bit of stainless as of late.

 

Nice job on the butterfly sheath. too. Did you ever see Kenny Rowe do one of those? Your stitching is first class, especially with that tooling around the welt. Did you stitch then tool, or tool then stitch? Inquiring minds and so on. :lol:

I have seen Kenny do a couple of sheaths in that style. I usually stitch with my Tippman Boss, but this one is "painfully" hand-stitched. I make my pattern, cut it out, tool it, and then stitch it together. If everything goes right, the knife actually fits. By the way, that small bit of tooling around the stitches was done with a very small "Torx" bit.

 

Thanks for the kind comments.

 

Robert

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nice knife, very nice doming of the pins, too.

 

kc

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