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Rondel #2


Scott A. Roush
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Just finished another rondel from W1 round stock. 18" or so on total length. On this one I wanted to go with single edge and heavy geometry for all your knightly armor piercing needs. Browned wrought iron, Gaboon ebony and steel/copper twisted wire. I will try to get some closer hilt pictures later today.. I'm still fiddling with the wire... oh the contrary wire.

 

 

rondel2.jpg

 

rondel1.jpg

 

rondel4.jpg

 

rondel5.jpg

Edited by Scott A. Roush
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Just Think, I knew that knife when it was just a baby!

Troy Allen Christianson is NOT a "Licensed Bladesmith" so you may treat his posts with the contempt they deserve.

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Just finished another rondel from W1 round stock. 18" or so on total length. On this one I wanted to go with single edge and heavy geometry for all your knightly armor piercing needs. Browned wrought iron, Gaboon ebony and steel/copper twisted wire. I will try to get some closer hilt pictures later today.. I'm still fiddling with the wire... oh the contrary wire.

 

 

rondel2.jpg

 

rondel1.jpg

 

rondel4.jpg

 

rondel5.jpg

 

I like it , congratulations.

 

Saludos desde Mexico

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I like it, both as a historical reproduction and as a work of art. Great workmanship.

 

On an historical note. The armor piercing aspect of a knife or even a sword is pretty much an exaggeration that originated in the Victorian era. The stout blades might have been used to stab through lighter leather or cloth armor but mostly they were needed to stab through heavy bone, such as the skull. The long blades came in handy if one found an opponent's throat exposed or a gap in the armor like around the arm hole and you needed the reach to get to the vitals.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Yeah I guess I assumed that pretty much anything would be deflected by plate. But it seems the thickness would help to point to slide into a nice little exposed chink?

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plate was curved which made it really difficult to penetrate but it wasn't impossible bodkin arrow heads were really good at putting holes in it i think this would give some one in plate a bad day ^_^

 

and i have a french chef knife i made that proved to me that the skin would slow down the blade more than a set of ribs when i tested it on a deer carcass :wacko:

Brandon Sawisch bladesmith

 

eagles may soar but weasels don't get sucked in to jet engines

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nice work, Scott.

how thick is that thing?

kc

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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Awesome Scott!

 

A dagger any knight would be proud of.

 

These daggers were not meant to defeat armor. They were used to go in between the slots in your armor. In that, they likely worked quite well.,

 

But, I'll bet if I drove that sucker, full force, into your chainmail+padding, protected ribs, you would have a very bad day. ;)

 

Mark

Edited by Mark Green

Mark Green

 

I have a way? Is that better then a plan?

(cptn. Mal)

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Thanks folks!

 

Kevin.. it's really thick! Almost 1/2" at the guard. And it's W2.. so the radical cross-sectional geometry made for a crazy auto-hamon. But I tried to suppress how visual it would be with a higher grit finish.. There were already a little too many Japanese elements creeping in as it was!

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It's kind of hard for a knife or sword to pierce armor. Even cloth armor resists them well. But armor really can't cover everything, Henry VIII's suit of plate that he had made for the Field of Cloth meeting not withstandin, which, by the way he never wore there. Even with that, the visor could probably have been shoved back and the blade stabbed through the eye socket into the brain if the wearer was down and disabled. I wonder how many times someone came up with their blade between their opponent's legs and into their abdomen. I read of an incident where supposedly a knight was knocked forward in his saddle exposing the seat of his pants and he took a Texas heart shot from an arrow. A very undignified way to go, if you ask me :blink: .

 

Doug

Edited by Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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There were already a little too many Japanese elements creeping in as it was!

 

 

Ha Ha... that made me laugh.. Very nice Scott. There's some neat techniques and ideas going on with this one.

- Stuart

www.sbransonknives.com

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Scott that finished off nicely and looks like it would do a great job in battle, your pictures arn't doing the blade justice thought I really loved the shape of this one outta your pile of blades you had! ^_^

-Michael Lenaghan

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Thanks Michael...

 

Yeah this one isn't photographing well. I'm going to shoot it again a bit this morning while the light is nice.

 

And thanks Stuart... You laugh because you know the feeling I bet! Us cross-cultural, cross-time period makers get easily confused....

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Sorry Scott I wasn't meaning to say your photo's weren't good, just that the blade has a "strong presence" when you handle it and I guess a picture can't show something like that :wacko:

 

 

I just realized, I never asked you about taken pictures of knives while we where there... :angry: that would have been something I'd like to see!

-Michael Lenaghan

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Nice job, Scott! Good call on the thick and pointy, too. I must agree with Mark, no matter what your opponent was wearing, a good hard thrust with that would cause them to have a bad day if you chose the right spot. B)

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Nice job, Scott! Good call on the thick and pointy, too. I must agree with Mark, no matter what your opponent was wearing, a good hard thrust with that would cause them to have a bad day if you chose the right spot. B)

 

Especially when utilized in the point-down ice pick manner that I've seen in period art work!

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