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My head is still reeling from peter's lecture. going out to buy some huge paper to try it today!

 

Benjamin

 

Be warned, Peter makes it look easy. Hearing the theory explained, and seeing his diagrams isn't the same as attempting to design your own sword using the method. I've tried and even with Peter helping via PM, screwed it up.

 

Peter mentioned he is going to be publishing a step-by-step method for applying his theory to the design of a sword. Perhaps he'll chime in when that might be available. I know I'm buying a copy as soon as it comes out!

 

--Dave

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Be warned, Peter makes it look easy. Hearing the theory explained, and seeing his diagrams isn't the same as attempting to design your own sword using the method. I've tried and even with Peter helping via PM, screwed it up.

 

Peter mentioned he is going to be publishing a step-by-step method for applying his theory to the design of a sword. Perhaps he'll chime in when that might be available. I know I'm buying a copy as soon as it comes out!

 

--Dave

 

Oh believe me I'm not expecting it to be easy but that's the fun of it. still i can't wait till Peter publishes that book. I will immediately buy it.

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Is there a copy of Jim Kelso's video to see? I'd missed out on it.

 

Thanks Dave for including my bit on the DVD.

I've posted it at YouTube in the meantime. Not great quality and be forewarned: "May cause drowsiness" :unsure:

 

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I hope and pray that someday I can pay it forward.

 

This is exactly what I hoped would be the result of this event. Learn it, use it, pass it on. As the craft grows, everyone benefits. The rising tide floats all boats.

 

Thanks Ron!

 

--Dave

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Yep I'll just have to wait for the dvd. The vids just keep freezing while the presenter keeps speaking. I miss too much.

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Just wanted to say "thank you" for making these videos available. I would love to purchase a DVD when available. Well done.

 

-Marcus Mucha

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Just need to say thank you for all words of appreciation.

It was great to get the opportunity to participate in this event.

 

I am never comfortable in front of a camera, but it was made easier by having the rest of the group sitting in the same room.

Van Clifton did a tremendous job of making the presentations into live broad casts. He is a man with a very good head on his shoulders, and has a heart to match it.

 

It was really good to do part of a hammer in public like this and record it. I think it made everyone involved a bit more focused. I am looking forward to getting the DVD myself. I learned very much from all presentations.

 

Regarding the stuff I showed, I really hope to get a opportunity to put together the three aspects of the sword: its craft, its engineering and its aesthetics & methods of design into a book of some kind. The time spent on research on my hypothesis of geometrically derived design has taken two years work so far, with very little work being done in the smithy (that is why I have been slow in showing new work). I need to catch up and generate some income before I can dedicate time to writing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Wow, what an enormous wealth of knowledge. These are definitely the best bladesmithing-related videos I have seen so far. Watching all of them was really amazing. Will have to get the dvd when it's out, for sure.

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Thanks guys.

 

When it's ready I'll post link to which everyone can go to order one.

 

We just finished compiling all the DV tapes onto a hard drive. It almost filled an entire terabyte HD!

 

We have a ton of "behind the scenes" footage which is pretty cool that will be on the DVDs as well as the presentations. It looks as if it will be at least a 2 disc (maybe 3 disc) set.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I know it seems like a long time, but believe it or not, Van has been editing nearly day and night since the end of the event!

 

It will be a four disc DVD set. Not only will all the presentations be on the discs, but a TON of extra behind the scenes footage.

 

I promise that the forum will have first crack at the DVDs once they are available.

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

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perhaps a bit silly, but I'm really curious about it:

In Peter's 2nd video there's a slide about dividing circles in equal parts (3 up to 10 I believe). Lateron he also mentions a sword he designs and constructs while starting with 7 circles and a 7-pointed star in the first circle, which he uses to design pommel, hilt...

 

Ever since I saw that video the first time I've been asking myself if I would be able to divide a circle into 2,3,4,5...10 equal pieces using only a compass and a ruler, as architects in medieval period would do.

2,3,4,6,8 I did remember from math class in school. 5 I actually just (re-)discovered today, so that covers 10 as well.

but what about 7??

 

Browsing the web it seems impossible "because Gauss said so".

Off course you can take a calculater and do 360/7, but what about medieval architects? Would that indicate that -although 7 was such a mythical number- they weren't able to divide a circle in 7 equal parts? What about 9 pieces? Internet seems to suggest that's impossible with just a compass and a ruler as well?

 

If that's the case then in all medieval architecture/sworddesign there wouldn't be any example of a 9 pointed star or a circle divided in 7 equal parts?

Edited by Ruben Delanghe
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Hi Rueben,

 

The scholars argue about how the circle was divided into five and seven parts in the medieval period. Looking at architecture and art, we can see they somehow managed to do this, but it seems there are very few (any at all?) remaining notebooks or sketches that reveal how it was done.

The five-fold division is common in medieval art as is the nine-fold division. The seven-fold is not very common.

 

We have Dürer´s solution to how the circle is divided into seven parts. See below (my drawing after Dürer´s original):

This solution does not result in a mathematically exact heptagon, but it is close. Walking the compass around the circle clockwise and anti-clockwise, you will find the discrepancy and can then use that to work out a division that is more exact. Dürer´s solution is exact enough that it would be useful for many purposes straight of, but it is possible to refine it if greater exactness is wanted and/or if the drawing is made in large size where the difference will be more noticeable.

 

DürerHeptagon.jpg

 

In Mathes Roriczer´s "Geometria Deutsch" printed in the late 15th century there is another method for constructing the heptagon. I shall post it shortly.

 

Similarly, the division of the circle in five may have been arrived at by gradual refinement, rather than a method that gave the correct cuts straight away. The heptagon is pretty rare in medeival art and architecture. The pentagon, pentagram and five pass window is very common on the other hand. Below a method that results in five cuts of the circumference of the circle. It is debated if this method was known in the medieval period. Like Durer´s heptagon above it is not perfectly mathematically perfect, but it is very close to a true five-fold division.

 

Pentagon.jpg

 

The same goes for the nine fold division: it was a common form. I am not certain I have seen a period method to construct it. I do not know if they had a method for dividing an angle in three equal parts. That has long been an impossible task with compass and straight edge. I have seen a recent solution that is elegant. Maybe it was known and used in medieval times as well? That would be rather sensational and I cannot suggest it was so. Somehow they did divide an angle in three parts (to be able to rotate and superimpose the equilateral triangle three times upon itself, and so constructing a nine sided form). Or perhaps they used a method to gradually work out an approximate by walking the compass around clockwise and anti-clockwise.

 

Nona.jpg

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