Jump to content

Quiver and bow case


Wild Rose

Recommended Posts

Still dealing with some chronic health issues (and otherthings) that have slowed me way down, but I finally got something done....

 

This is a pre-1850 quiver and bow case made of heavy braintanned elk with early Cheyenne style pound bead work. Other deco includesfringe, brass beads, tin cones, horse and human hair. The base of the quiver ismade of 5/16" thick neck hide the arrow points from dulling with an outercover of rawhide to keep the points from poking through.

 

While not a direct copy it is based on several originals

 

 

quiver-2012-palmer-1.jpg

 

 

quiver-2012-palmer-2.jpg

 

 

quiver-2012-palmer-3.jpg

 

 

A belated Christmasgift it's a companion piece to this SW style knife and sheath and Cheyennestyle pipe bag ---

 

 

wild-goo-2010-28-01.jpg

 

 

pipebag-2011-01-1.jpg

Chuck Burrows

Wild Rose Trading Co

chuck@wrtcleather.com

www.wrtcleather.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Over the top fantastic Chuck! Hope you are doing better.

Troy Allen Christianson is NOT a "Licensed Bladesmith" so you may treat his posts with the contempt they deserve.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice, that pipe bag is awesome. I put human hair on my mountain man outfit, I had long hair at the time. I mean I had hair at the time, it freaked my companions out a little. Nice looking stuff sorry to hear you've been down. Get better so you can go burn some charcoal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glad ya'll enjoyed the look and like Jim P the hair came from my own head - I've worn it long for most of the last 45 years except when doing construction work back in the 1980's. A couple of years ago I was wearing braids and it had gotten to be about 38" long (I'm 5; 11") and one day I got tired of sitting on it and cut a foot off....

 

 

Art - I love flute music, especially "native" stuff and I'll take anything that helps.....

 

Jim I don't burn much charcoal for blade smithing these days due to health concerns (damaged immune system due to long term chemical exposure causing some chronic systemic problems - not curable but at least controllable that along with a 30 year old back/neck injury has made me old before my time - did lose 50 pounds, tough way to do it though LOL!), but I still love doing the handles and fittings so still do a bit of pounding for the latter - doing collaborations with three other blade smith friends keeps me supplied with blades - I love working with others and bouncing ideas around. One friend lives just 4 miles away and so I have access to his forge and shop anytime I want.

 

As for my beaded Indian/Scout/mtn man gear, funny thing is about 10 years ago I came close to quitting doing any frontier gear with beadwork which had always been my first love since age 8 (I'm 59) - I had gone off in another more modern direction for a while with my leather work and then on top of that my brother in-law got invalided and I gave him my beading stuff for therapy. A couple months after that though I got some longhorn beef stew bones from a neighbor and after boiling the meat down I found a hock bone that just sort of screamed war club to me. I asked a friend, knife maker Gib Guignard, if he wanted to forge a blade for me and then we decided to do a companion knifeand sheath. That re-fired my 40+ year passion for "frontier" gear -due to my back issues I also found it was easier on my bod then the heavy stamping and tooling work I had gotten into and now I prefer doing this typework more than anything else and so far the fire in my gut is still burning bright- it was passion for most of my life and now looks like it will stay that way.

 

 

 

Here's the set Gib (RIP mi amigo) collaborated on -

 

CactusRose-01-Warclub-Set.jpg

 

I added a piece of deer antler to the hock bone for a handle and made it into a quirt/club. The knife has a deer leg bone handle with a piece of deer antler for a bolster. The bead work is in the pre-1850 Absaroka style.

 

a

Edited by Wild Rose

Chuck Burrows

Wild Rose Trading Co

chuck@wrtcleather.com

www.wrtcleather.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Art - do you have any recordings of your work? I also like the mix of native flute and nouveau flamenco - a favorite is the album Native Flamenco

http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/B00000JNKP

 

probably due to my partial heritage of Tuscarora/Choctaw and Spanish Gypsy..........:D

 

I also happen to live in the country (the Four Corners on the So Ute Rez) where it's a "natural" mix of cultures ............

 

 

Carlos Nakai is another favorite along with Ottmar Liebert (I like old school traditional flamenco as well but for many it's an acquired taste)........

Edited by Wild Rose

Chuck Burrows

Wild Rose Trading Co

chuck@wrtcleather.com

www.wrtcleather.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well hold on to your hat mister. My mother emigrated to the U.S. from Pallafugel Spain when she was 4. That's part of Cataluña, in the North of Spain on the Coast. It's near France as you might tell from the French sounding influence of the towns name. At one time back in the day it was part of France.

 

Carlos Nakai is an icon to the flute as you are to period leather work. My flute is made by Odell Borg of Spirit Flutes. I like his work. Without getting too sentimental, the flute for me is spiritual. My way of connecting to nature and my maker. I only play to indulge myself. No recordings, but thanks for asking.

 

Funny you should mention flamenco. I practice, (note I didn't say play), the flamenco guitar. Traditional only. However I do like to listen to the Gypsy Kings and their ilk. They play Spanish Rumba style flamenco. Traditionalists look down their noses at them but that's their loss. Did you knw the Gypsy Kings are French. The're from French Cataluña. That's why their Spanish sounds a little off to me.

 

And then there's that beautiful native american set you made, (thought I better get some knife stuff in here).

 

You should be feeling a little better today. :) -Art

 

p.s. One last thing. The 'glyps that I played at last night are very sacred to the local Paiutes here in the Valley. They hold spiritual ceremonies there to this day.

Edited by Art Lawrence

"My sword and my shield are at your command"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...