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wootz steel durability


Ed Street
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Ok I have to ask the pro's here about wootz steel. It was brought to my attention that wootz steel would not pass the ABS 2x4 chopping test.

 

So my question is this. Can any one here that has worked with wootz confirm or deny this please?

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This isn't exactly the kind of answer you're probably looking for, but I'm not so sure you could enter a wootz blade into an ABS performance test. The journeyman test specifies that the blade must be monosteel, then the master test requires a pattern welded blade of at least 300 layers. Incidentally, I'm not sure if wootz would satisfy either of these.

 

With that being said, I would love to see the results of a performance test on modern wootz.

 

-Ethan

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i think the part it would have problems with is the bend test from what i have herd home made pure steels tend to be not so flexible i know of one occurrence of steel made from sand where wile hand sanding the blade it hit the table and blew a good size piece of the tip off

Brandon Sawisch bladesmith

 

eagles may soar but weasels don't get sucked in to jet engines

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i think the part it would have problems with is the bend test from what i have herd home made pure steels tend to be not so flexible i know of one occurrence of steel made from sand where wile hand sanding the blade it hit the table and blew a good size piece of the tip off

 

IIRC, the ABS wants to see factory monosteel at the JS level, and 300+ layer damascus at the MS level. Wootz is not part of the ABS vocabulary.

 

The event you describe sounds like terrible heat treatment, more than material choice. My experience is that home-made steels tend to be more forgiving in a bend than higher alloy materials, but that's just me.

The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

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Ok I have to ask the pro's here about wootz steel. It was brought to my attention that wootz steel would not pass the ABS 2x4 chopping test.

 

So my question is this. Can any one here that has worked with wootz confirm or deny this please?

 

Give me the NAME of the person at the ABS that said this.

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

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I can't imagine why anyone would say that. Properly HT'ed (and there is a catch, perhaps. I've heard, but do not know for sure, that some wootz blades were not hardened, which would probably prevent you from succeeding at the chop test.) A blade (accidentally) made from mild steel was able to do the rope cut, but folded up in the chop. This happened at the ABS school in the late '90's.

 

Wootz is not technically a "layered" steel, so it doesn't qualify for the MS test blade. That is how I read the rules, but you shouldn't take that as absolute.

 

Where did you hear this, and who said it? It would be interesting to know.

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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I allow myself to quote from Greg Obach "replication of Wootz":

>>Cutting Edge Durability of Wootz

 

The beginning of this section is devoted to testing the edge retention and cutting ability of a wootz knife blade. The first test is the ability of a knife to cut through a free hanging 1-inch hemp rope. The process of edge testing used is similar to the test detailed by the American Bladesmith Journeyman exam. The exam information is further explained on the http://www.americanbladesmith.com/ABS_JSTest.htm website.

 

The knife used in this test was a wootz bowie knife forged out of similar steel to the prior test pieces. The bowie knife had an edge ground onto the bevel with a 600 grit aluminum oxide paper and sanding block. Once proper technique was used, the knife was able to cut through the rope on 3 occasions.

 

On the second part of the second part of the test, the blade was used to chop through a spruce 2 inch by 4-inch board length twice. The edge test was performed three times and showed no signs of a chipped or compacted blade edge. The blade carried no visible damage from the previous tests.

 

The final test was to shave hair, showing that the keen edge has remained intact through the previous tests. The knife remained largely sharp on the vast majority of it’s surface and could shave hair. The hammered bevel blades performed the tests with the same results as the ground in edge knives.<<

 

this text was easily found on the web,

did you read that, Ed? you can find the whole article on:

http://users.unitz.ca/gthomas/myweb4/replication_of_wootz.htm

 

I thought it was standard knowledge by now

Jokke

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I also have the feeling that saying wootz is a little like saying 10XX steel or W1. I would think that the carbon content could be all over the place and even have other alloying elements show up in the mix. As far as submitting one for JS testing, I'd get a written opinion from the ABS before attempting it. Just in case the judge(s) have other ideas.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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