Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Alan Longmire

How NOT to use a sledge hammer

Recommended Posts

Thanks again, guys. Art, I know the doohicky of which you speak, might be just the thing once I can bend it all the way closed.

 

Petr, what can I say? I need adult supervision, apparently. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think he's talking about the grip master.

 

You definitely want that scar tissue to be worked as it's forming. It's delicate for a while and then once it's done healing getting some stretch/flexibility can be challenging. So every minute you spend working it now is an hour you're saving having to do it after it heals. You have about six weeks for complete tissue healing so kick butt now on it.

 

hand_exerciser_gripmaster.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Brent, that is the doohicky I was thinking of. I do know the importance of working it, and now the knuckle is back in place I have been stretching it as much as I can stand. Getting a little internal bleeding to let me know how much is enough, but such is life. I'm just glad it's still there! B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its been a few months since my accident, I still have problems wielding hammers, scar tissue and all.

Mine was a tear :(

Glad to hear you are recovering very fast!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heal up guys! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This might be an interesting place to list the various dangers in the common shop.

 

 

 

Personally, I live by the rule that "hand tools hurt, power tools maim." It seems your maiming is the exception, as most hand work moves stuff too slow to do too much damage.

 

 

 

I regard my buffer as the single most dangerous tool I own, with drill press and lathe close behind. I've injured myself on my grinder several times, and while no experience has been pleasant, I've walked away from all without much damage. I demo it's power with a 36 grit belt and an elk bone, to people new to a shop, and suggest that one's finger will put up far less resistance than that big thing.

 

 

Any saw is, of course, to be deeply respected, and the old rule of "cut away from yourself" applies to any carving, sawing, or chopping of material anywhere, anytime.

 

 

 

I fear someone has lost a hand or digit to a power hammer or press, but I can't recall it ever happening. Nevertheless, only hot metal goes in there, guys.

 

 

 

Just some of my observations, and suggestions. Anyone have any others?

 

 

 

Heal well, Alan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally, I live by the rule that "hand tools hurt, power tools maim." It seems your maiming is the exception, as most hand work moves stuff too slow to do too much damage.

 

I move that a ten-pound sledge be considered a power tool for the sake of that rule. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan, I am glad you are on the way to healing.

Please don´t do that again.

 

I will keep your handy work in mind and perhaps I will start working a bit more safely myself.

It looked pretty raw, that thing you did to your hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's delicate for a while and then once it's done healing getting some stretch/flexibility can be challenging.

I cut my finger between the first two knuckles fairly deep with the point of a blade I was working on several months ago, and it was probably deep enough to warrant stitches. But, I'm stubborn and just let it heal. While the scar is totally healed over, I can't bend my finger much past straight (uncurling) without feeling it strain, and probably will be the same way for the rest of my life.

Several have mentioned it, but I'll say it again- stretching/flexing while it heals is very important to regaining full range of mobility.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan,

 

I hope your finger's improving!

 

I know... stuff like that sucks big time...

 

Once upon a time at a friend's shop, right before going on a long vacation I managed to grind half my index finger down to the bone with a 60 grit belt that was suddenly partially jumping of his piece-of-shit grinder at 36m/s (118 fps) - industrial junk ;).

sliced right down 1/3 into the finger... got dirty, didn't heal, got infected, needed antibiotics and a proper wound cleaning and some wound debridement (not that much fun)...

But then again... as you say, in a foreign shop: watch out and be careful,...

 

take care!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tell people, a careless person in another persons shop is the most dangerous thing in the world. its best to have hands in pockets and steer clear till you get familiar with the layout and tools used.

But thats to people in my shop. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ouch, just seen this thread Alan - hope the mending is still going ok!

 

Just about the most dangerous think I can think of in the shop (and ive nearly lopped a finger off a couple of times) is drilling stuff without the work held properly ( I heard it called 'the spinning helecopter of death' on another forum!)

 

I have to really force myself to clamp stuff for drilling - my brain still thinks it will be ok just to hold it on a block of wood.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, John, it's now just a cool raised red scar that's a mite tender, but everything works as it should. B)

 

And Stephen Fowler was sporting a nice cut from wrist to thumbtip on his left hand from a bit of micarta he was drilling last week when I saw him at Bowie's. I think we've all made that mistake once or twice before we start clamping when possible. Or when we remember... :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was working in the clinic you wouldn't believe the number of explanations for the accident started out "I was in a hurry".

 

Doug

Edited by Doug Lester

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rushing is never any good.

 

If I'm not feeling 100% I don't *&^% around with fire, hydraulics, hammers, drills, hand & power saws, propane, 1500F molten salts, 450F self-oxidizing salts, various acids, various dusts or what-have-you.

 

Nope. As I said to an artisan employer once... you can have it quick, or you can have it right... you paying the hospital bill?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yikes Alan, I missed this. Hope you are well under way to total healing.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow I missed this too. That's a nasty one! Thanks for taking the time to post the story, It's a good reminder to all of us. I hope it's healing well and you're able to use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again for the well-wishes, guys. I'm back to what passes for normal, except for a lumpy raised red scar that looks kind of like poison ivy on the knuckle. Fully functional if a bit tight. I'd call it 98% of a full recovery, and the feeling is slowly coming back too.

 

Jake, I immediately thought about the time you ran the tang of a blade through your hand when I did it. It's always good to share those "learn from my fail" moments. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again for the well-wishes, guys. I'm back to what passes for normal, except for a lumpy raised red scar that looks kind of like poison ivy on the knuckle. Fully functional if a bit tight. I'd call it 98% of a full recovery, and the feeling is slowly coming back too.

 

Jake, I immediately thought about the time you ran the tang of a blade through your hand when I did it. It's always good to share those "learn from my fail" moments. :lol:

Glad to hear it's healed pretty well.

Hah I thought of that too when I saw this! Instead of clamping the blade of a sgian dhu in the vise to burn the tang into an antler grip, I grabbed it with a pair of needle nosed pliers and tried to manually burn the tang through(this was one of my stupider moments). So I was holding the antler grip in my left hand and the needle nosed pliers in my right,with the blade pointing towards my right knuckle, and pushing them towards each other as hard as I could, arms trembling with the effort. when the needle nosed plies slipped, I stabbed myself as hard as I possibly could in my right knuckle with the sgian. It was just like you described Alan, instant sheet of blood, and you know right away how bad it is. That was no where near as bad as this one of yours though, I think that's the worst injury I've seen that didn't result in an amputation!

I always clamp blades now and more importantly, If I'm too tired to do something properly I put the tools down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to hear you're ok, Alan. About 5 years ago, when I started out, I had a set of steel tongs. I was so new and still teaching myself, I didn't know that you couldn't quench steel tongs. One day, I was in the backyard forging out a knife. I took the billet out of the fire and as soon as I hit it with the hammer (with too much force, I have to say) the pivot pin sheered and the billet went flying up into the air. Without thinking, I dropped everything, let out a loud "battle cry", dived over the pinic table and crouched in the same fashion I would if in response to a mortar attack. Moments later, my sister had come outside to see what the rucus was. She looked down and saw a hot piece of steel lying on the ground near my anvil. Then me curled up underneath the picnic table. She later filled me in on why she came rushing out so fast...evidently my battle cry sounds a lot like a four year old girl screaming. Took quite sometime to live that one down. No injuries, fortunately, but my pride took quite a beating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...