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Forged W2 steel blade 13" nagasa. Differentially heat treated using water. Crab claw menuki and engraved crab in the fuchi and kashira. The tsuba is made from copper that was melted and poured into boiling water -yuwake-. Copper made in this way takes on different coloration during the patina process using the niage technique and more vivid browns and reds can be coaxed out of the metal creating a slight contrast to the lighter brown and orange coloration of the seppa, fuchi and kashira. The saya is made of lacquered poplar with copper rim and horn kurikata.

 

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Trust me pictures do not come close to what Jesus's work looks like and feels like in your hand. I had the privilege to see his work in person this weekend and it will make me a better knife maker just seeing what true quality looks like up close. Jesus I am glad to have had a chance to meet you and see your demo and your work Thanks.

 

Kip Kaiser

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Neat theme for a blade. I love the colour/texture of the copper, it's perfect!

 

John

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I got to play with this at Bowie's too, and the pictures do it justice. In fact, the hamon looks better in pictures than in full daylight! :lol: That said, it's a truly beautiful piece, and feels as good in the hand as it looks to the eye. B) The detail around the edge of the tsuba is the only thing that doesn't really come through in these pics, it's VERY nicely raised and patinated.

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That is simply stunning Jesus.

 

To get that frostiness in W2 shows real control and knowledge of you materials and tools.

 

Your skill level has through the roof with you being "retired" I don't think any of us will be able to catch up! :D

 

Matt

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Very nice Jesus!! I am particularly interested in that technique of melting the copper for the tsuba. I saw it on the Ford Hallam video but it never occurred to me to try it with just copper. Very interesting.

Amazing hamon. Any pics of the clay layout? ;)

Edited by SBranson
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Thanks, Matt. The only advantage I have is having more time in my hands.

 

Stuart, I did not get any pictures of the clay. Ford's description of the yuwake process is was let me to give it a try.

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