Jump to content
Ben Potter

Cast-on Hilt video

Recommended Posts

I have gotten many requests for information about Casting-on hilt components so here is the way I do it.

 

 

Enjoy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the melting point of that alloy, and did you have to worry about heat transfering into the blade or charring your wood?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was excellent. Casting and some extra walk-throughs, too.

 

The silver alloy coils looked and behaved just like solder, but it's something different?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool Vid. I sometimes use lead free pewter that same way. Never tried silver. I liked the way you heated the pouring spout on your ladle before you poured. Sadly I have never thought to do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind words.

 

The alloy melts at about 450-475 but cools really fast and I have never had a problem with the temper on the blade.

 

The alloy is lead free silver solder like the kind at the hardware store.

 

Alan has a great tutorial on working with this stuff (where I learned)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice job, Ben. B)

 

You are going to have to stop calling it "Silver Alloy," though. I had a long argument with a hawk customer last month who insisted you were pouring sterling silver bolsters, and didn't see why I wouldn't do that too. :lol: "Silver bearing alloy" is correct, since there is usually about 1-4% silver in there, depending on the brand. ;)

 

I usually just call it lead-free pewter, but that doesn't sound as cool as mentioning the silver content. ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually refer to the non-silver lead free one as pewter and the silver bearing one as silver alloy (never as sterling however :blink: ).

Helps explaining the price difference and the look of the finished piece ;) .

 

I see what you are saying, though and will give it some thought.

Edited by Ben Potter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Silver bearing solder, or lead free solder. Generally 96% tin and 4% silver. Iowa State University's most finacially lucrative patent, ever. The inventor still works at Ames Lab D.O.E.. Good stuff. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ben,

thanks for the tutorial. I never get the same level of outcome, but I think it may be that I haven't been following the heat/torch as close to the actual pour as possible. I have been removing heat earlier, and sometimes the whole bolster doesn't cast without part of it trying to solidify before the rest is poured. I have to get smooth with the movements.

 

thanks again,

kc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How durable is this? Is it considered a serviceable bolster/hilt?

 

I imagine it to be far softer than brass just about anything I would think to use.

 

Maybe it's that it just seems too good to be true. Inlays and all sorts of things could be done this way. Far easier than filing for hours.

 

Thanks so much for the video. You make it look easy, that means you must have it mastered to some extent :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good video Ben. The couple of times I've tried it I've had problems with the bolster dipping in at the blade joint. I assume something with heat transfering out o fhte alloy too quick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I've stolen this one. You might as well call the cops. :( Nice video. On my first attempt, I didn't get the cardboard sealed well and most of the solder escaped the mold and was trapped in the tape. The second attempt came out pretty good. But I have to get my hands on some more solder to do the buttcap. Thanks for posting this. You helped me get a new idea of how to do a different bolster/buttcap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very Very cool and simple! The applications and variations are endless. I love new things to try, especially when they make sense to my brain. Any reason you don't cut off the tang shorter (below the end of the pommel), drill near the end of the tang, insert a small cross pin, then cast the pommel piece? The cross pin should give the pommel good holding to the tang and would the end of the tang would be invisible. Might be a good place to do some more carving/filework on the end of the pommel. Just a thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, I'm interested to know if that would work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, I'm interested to know if that would work.

 

Yeah, that works fine. Have you looked at the tutorial I did?

 

Lots of stuff you can do with it. B) If you use the 4% silver, it can even be polished to a mirror shine. It will eventually tarnish to a dull gray (the silver wants to turn black and the tin wants to turn gray/white), but it stays shiny a LONG time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, that works fine. Have you looked at the tutorial I did?

 

Lots of stuff you can do with it. B) If you use the 4% silver, it can even be polished to a mirror shine. It will eventually tarnish to a dull gray (the silver wants to turn black and the tin wants to turn gray/white), but it stays shiny a LONG time.

 

Yeah, your tutorial nudged me in the right direction and Ben's pushed me over the top. I was wanting to do my next axe haft the way you did, but I just didn't have the guts to do it. :rolleyes:

 

edit: Both you guys will get credit when I finish and post my knife.

Edited by Eric C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...