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JJ Simon

Got a milling machine

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I was very fortunate to be given a line on this mill.

Great working order.

2HP geared motor.

Comes with the vice in the picture and a whole set of quick change collets.

I can't wait to learn how to use it.

mill.jpg

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Sweet fine, looks like a perfect size. I've been hunting lately for some used machinery but haven't had much luck. Wish I had one!

 

John

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Thats actually a mill drill but still a fine score

I'm looking for one for my shop too... B)

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Give it a bit of TLC...

 

the rusty aspect makes me cringe ;O)

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It will be cleaned and oiled before delivery. Thankfully.

It is a mill and drill.

Watched it run and it cuts very nicely.

Like I said I'm excited to start learning with it and see how it helps my knife making.

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Cool! I got rid of my quick change collets. They weren't quick and took up 3 1/2" of Z axis. The quick change collet also seemed to chatter a little no matter how tight I torqued it.

 

It opens up a whole new world in things you can do beyond slotting guards. Don't forget all the wood working you can do. It's surprising how clean you can router wood with it.

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Oh Boy Oh Boy Oh Boy,

I have all these things I want to learn to do.

Like can you cut and external curve. I know you can cut an internal curve with a fly cutter?

I can't wait to be able to true material. Mokume, Damascus, Flats etc. I'm very excited.

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Oh Boy Oh Boy Oh Boy,

I have all these things I want to learn to do.

Like can you cut and external curve. I know you can cut an internal curve with a fly cutter?

I can't wait to be able to true material. Mokume, Damascus, Flats etc. I'm very excited.

 

JJ,

 

Yes you can cut external curves - but you need a special contraption: rotary table...

 

 

Quick-Change collets... at least the one on my mill (an Aciera F3) doesn't add a lot of chatter / vibrations... it's actually true enough to keep stuff within a very good precision.

But my ER32 collet holder was rather expensive... I had a cheap one before that - and it induced a lot of problems on it's own.

...

 

I'd advise to take some machining classes or at least get a few machinists handbooks... these books can give you the basics on type of tools for what kind of job, setting up the work on the mill, adjusting speeds, etc.

 

milling can be fun... ;)

 

the photo below shows my mill with it's table angled, head tilted, rotary table installed and I'm milling "knife-edge" inside slots on a venturi burner tube:

 

2012_11_%25209_22_%25200.jpg

 

 

 

And another bit of advice: if you buy tooling, don't opt for cheap - it'll cost you more than a good tool, as you'll run through it too quick and the results often will show it too.

You don't need the highest grade stuff available for 90% of the work - but something in the middle.... ;)

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Daniel thank you for the advice.

I downloaded a 482 page book called "Milling machines and milling practices" By D. DE Vries.

Its old but I'm hoping it directly relates to manual milling.

I have already looked at a magnetic rotary angle table.

I appreciate the advice on the tooling.

It will take me a while to build supplies but that's fine.

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JJ

 

First thing you have to understand is the difference between climb milling

300px-Climb_Milling_01.png

 

and conventional milling.

275px-Conventional_Milling_01.png

You almost NEVER climb mill on a manual mill. Conventional milling forces the lead nut against the threads of the lead screw. Climb milling pulls the lead nut AWAY from lead screw threads.

 

Here is a short video that gives a basic idea.

 

And a link to his website that gives a lot of info.

Tool and Die guy.

 

Get it in your head from the beginning-will save a lot of cutters and frustration.

 

Nice machine.

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JJ,

 

The book is still very much valid when it come to practical stuff...

sure it doesn't feature the latest info in Carbide-Cutters (changeable or full carbide), CNC, etc... but for basic machine operation it's a good ref.

I've looked at that book, and reg. the PDF - check out pages (PDF) 34-62 (working meth. of a cutter)

Page 163 (cutting Speed HSS)

...

 

Stuff to look out for:

What too for what purpose

Cutting Speeds

Mounting stuff and centering/aligning the cutting tool with the work-piece

 

 

Also as Dan said, climb milling is a no-go on most normal machines...

My Aciera can take it if I go really easy about it - and only if my tooling is really nice and sharp.

but you risk ruining work-piece and tools quicker than you would believe it.

it can yield much nicer surfaces on certain materials and with certain operations though ;)

but in 98% of the situation, "Conventional" milling is what you'd want.

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Thanks Dan.

I assume before watching that this is sort of the difference between Japanese and western saws.

In that one is push and one is pull?

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And Daniel, thanks again.

Your post popped up just as I replied to Dan.

I am into the book past your first page reference.

I have to admit the math is all beyond me.

I went to highschool for 5 years and that was over 20 years ago.

I can add, subtract, multiply and divide.

I don't remember formulas of any sorts.

The guy I am buying it from is providing me with a link to a few charts he has pinned on his wall that have to do with speed vs. size of the tool.

And I guess there is a formula there also.

Once again any help is appreciated.

My basic needs are slotting guards, dovetailing tangs so I can do some cool things with handles and doing shoulders on blades so that they are crisp and tight.

Also trueing and facing Mokume and Damascus billets and maybe even polishing them.

Then Also the Mill will be at my Tattoo Shop and one of my employees makes Tattoo Machines so he will be learning to use it too.

Once again I see there is a lot of studying.

I will look for a class locally to take also.

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It can also work great to surface handle slabs dead flat, and partial hidden tang slots. Wood fly cutters are real cheap and easy to sharpen the chisel grind on them. And mills do a great job at milling out wood presentation boxes for knives (and other stuff).

 

82768_R.jpg

Edited by B Finnigan

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What dan says is very true, when I bought my first mill, I didn't listen to my uncle, that I bought it from(who is a true machinist), and I went through atleast a hundred of so of bits, before he gave me a few books that he had, and then it was like a miracle happened. Definitely read up a lot on what you can, and get some tooling. Have fun with your new mill/drill. Also, I believe they make a tilting vice for milling, but have never used one. You should look into it, to widen the possibilities of what you can do.

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I have been looking at tilting rotary tables and magnetic vices.

Its gonna be an investment but I'm up for it.

I do appreciate the advice and will be doing as much reading as I can.

I also have several friends who are machinists and will be dropping by to show me the ropes.

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The tooling can bankrupt you. I'm sure seven years after getting mine I have equaled or exceeded the cost of the machine with just the tooling alone.:wacko:src="http://forums.dfoggknives.com/public/style_emoticons/default/wacko.gif">

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Yeah I can see that the tooling is going to be a larger investment than the machine.

Can someone clarify some things about carbide vs. HSS

ANy info will help

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Carbide in machining refers to Tungsten-carbide. It can cut most hardened steels.

HSS is high speed steel, in grades M2, M35 and M42. M2 is a tungsten-molybdenum alloy, M35 is similar but with ~5% cobalt, M42 has ~8% cobalt. The cobalt increases heat tolerance and toughness at high temperatures.

HSS can be used to cut unhardened steels at high speeds.

 

HSS bits are usually sufficient for most machine work. I only need carbide inserts when working with hardened steel.

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