Jump to content

The Catalan forge... "Farga Catalana"


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 138
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Success! The tuyere looks great and more importantly we have learned the process to make more.

miquel.

 

Miquel,

That was quite a marvelous casting project, congratulations. I have a couple of questions about the process. Did you switch sands to an oil bonded sand or a sand with an organic binder? Were you able to reuse the original copper material 3 times...was the copper fluxed?

Good luck with the next steps in the project ..I very much appreciate the energy you guys are putting into the project ( not to mention costs ).

Jan

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is so great Miquel.

 

I can't wait to see that Catalan furnace run.

 

Congrats on that casting. That tuyere looks great.

 

Mark

Link to post
Share on other sites

Miquel,

That was quite a marvelous casting project, congratulations. I have a couple of questions about the process. Did you switch sands to an oil bonded sand or a sand with an organic binder? Were you able to reuse the original copper material 3 times...was the copper fluxed?

Good luck with the next steps in the project ..I very much appreciate the energy you guys are putting into the project ( not to mention costs ).

Jan

 

 

Thank you, Jan for the encouragement and the comments. I am glad to be able to answer your questions.

As I said, I had no previous experience in foundry work. I understand that oil-bonded sand can be compacted better and allows for more surface detail. We used the most inexpensive way at our reach and the loss of surface detail was a trade-off. If you noticed in the pictures of the open mold, the surface has some continuity failures.

We used recycled copper without problems. We avoided copper pipes that had solder remains and only used pure copper. We use borax as a flux.

 

miquel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations!

 

That was an impressive little steam puff from the first riser in that video of the pour. Glad nobody got burned!

 

 

Thank you, Alan.

The gases were the result of combustion of a refractory paint we applied to protect the mold. We were lucky. Both of us survived unharmed.

We also made the mistake of resting the crucible on the moist ground. It could have been really bad…

Little by little we learn from our mistakes and we have no intention of winning a Darwin award.

 

 

miquel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Little by little we learn from our mistakes and we have no intention of winning a Darwin award.

 

 

miquel.

Great perseverance. The line above made me laugh, :D/>

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is so great Miquel.

 

I can't wait to see that Catalan furnace run.

 

Congrats on that casting. That tuyere looks great.

 

Mark

 

 

 

Thanks, Mark. Just hang in there for a bit longer. I have a lot of pictures to edit and I have to allow the translator some breaks (btw, Jesus is translating for me). May be later on we can talk about the benefits of this copper tuyere. Do you think that this conic shape will have any advantage over the copper pipes that you are using?

 

 

miquel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

May be later on we can talk about the benefits of this copper tuyere. Do you think that this conic shape will have any advantage over the copper pipes that you are using?

 

Two advantages:

 

1) Heat absorbed on the furnace end is gathered over a smaller surface area than the available radiating surface provided by the larger input end. An engineer might supply a 'best possible' ratio for this. This is the huge advantage of the forged copper tuyeres that a number of us are using. I would expect this function would be greatly reduced in a straight cylinder.

 

2) There is a pronounced increase in air velocity at the mouth of a conic tuyere. This in turn pushes the air deeper into the furnace. Coupled with the downward angle that is standard for many furnaces, the net effect is to sweep the heat zone more effectively into the volume of the furnace. This has a number of net benefits to effective operation of the furnace.

Again, there may be some ideal proportions for the furnace end vs the supply end (??).

 

Darrell

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two advantages:

 

1) Heat absorbed on the furnace end is gathered over a smaller surface area than the available radiating surface provided by the larger input end. An engineer might supply a 'best possible' ratio for this. This is the huge advantage of the forged copper tuyeres that a number of us are using. I would expect this function would be greatly reduced in a straight cylinder.

 

2) There is a pronounced increase in air velocity at the mouth of a conic tuyere. This in turn pushes the air deeper into the furnace. Coupled with the downward angle that is standard for many furnaces, the net effect is to sweep the heat zone more effectively into the volume of the furnace. This has a number of net benefits to effective operation of the furnace.

Again, there may be some ideal proportions for the furnace end vs the supply end (??).

 

Darrell

 

The supply tube to the tapered copper pipe can made to intentionally leak and carry heat from the copper back out away from the furnace..

Jan

Link to post
Share on other sites

Last minute touch-ups.

 

We reinforced the top rim of the furnace so that later on we could use as a leverage point at the time of pulling out the masser, (bloom.)

 

 

 

100_8635.JPG?psid=1

Edited by miquel
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ready for a test drive using wood only.

 

 

100_8638.JPG?psid=1

 

 

100_8639.JPG?psid=1

 

100_8644.JPG?psid=1

 

 

 

 

Looks like the trompe is working quite well.

 

All systems are go. We are now ready to run it.

 

 

 

miquel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe this is a bit strange qouistion, but when you cast the tube, cant you use a wooden stick to make the cone inside the tube? I dont think the wood will burn away, just carbonice into charcoal.

 

Im looking forward to see more from your Catalan experimnets.

 

Jens

 

 

That’s a dangerous idea. When the molten metal comes into contact with the wood, gases would be generated which will make the molten metal spill out in a very explosive way.

 

 

miquel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Having completed all the tests that we could do before hand, the day of truth came. We were a bit concerned as to how to manage the smelt using a this type of furnace but we trusted that our previous experience with other smelts will help guide us.

 

We begun early around 8 AM.

 

 

100_8711.JPG?psid=1

 

 

miquel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the guests had arrived as the furnace reached working temperature but we still had enough time to do breakfast before we started charging the ore.

 

 

CIMG0933.JPG?psid=1

 

 

CIMG0934.JPG?psid=1

 

 

miquel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...