Jump to content
jameswood

Bowie design, any improvements?

Recommended Posts

just scribbled this out, it will be as a thank you to another maker, but a bit of a surprise :)/>

 

about 10" over all. it will have random damascus blade, guard and spacer and brass 'washers'

 

undecided on the wood, i have some ebony, some stunning Ash and some Koa that i've got in mind :)/>

 

 

im not sure about the raised clip, it was an after thought but not a good one i dont think..

 

 

CCF06012013_00000_zps2bb64140.jpg

 

what do you recon?

Edited by jameswood

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I LIKE IT! Even though I hate bowies that get thinner width wise towards the tip usually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like it too, although this might be my least favourite style of knife (ducking for cover :ph34r: )

The raised clip doesn't look bad IMO. The only thing I might change is moving the guard a little closer to the trailing corner of the blade.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done now make a copy and color it to you desired design I.E. A color design it will help you vision your finished knife and give you a design to follow . However it is just a guide the Knife is close to what you want yet may not be 100% to the drawing . many of my customers like the drawing and materials listed as a certificate by me the maker . just remember to make a cope of it for your files as a reference . many buyers like one of a kind knives .

 

Sam

 

PS I look forward to seeing your work .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it's a good start, but i don't think it's quite there yet. I love the lines of the handle, the guard, the ricasso, and the heel of the blade, but the rest of the blade doesn't sit right to me. If i were designing this, i would work off the handle, formalising those relationships and establishing some guidelines from them - for example, i would establish a centre line for the whole piece ( a line a right angles to the guard, running through the centre point of the ricasso), another from the top of the butt of the handle through the top of the ricasso, and a third from the bottom of the butt through the heel of the blade. my guess would be that the most aesthetically pleasing design would have the tip pretty close to that centre line, and the rest of the blade not coming past the other two lines, or at least not by much.

 

one thing i find helpful when designing clip points in particular is to sketch in the line the spine would take if the clip was not present, just a smooth curve from the start of the clip to the point - a clip is basically an interrupted line, and our brains naturally fill in and extend broken or interrupted lines, so if the blade looks unbalanced without a clip, it will with one too.

 

obviously none of these are hard and fast rules, but they may provide a short-cut to achieving a nice visual balance. equally obviously, this is all just personal opinion, and all your knives that i've seen have an amazing sense of line and balance, so feel free to completely disregard everything i've said, but remember that paper is cheap, and time spent at the drawing board is never wasted...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that is very interesting what you say about removing the clip and replacing with a smooth line, or vise versa!

 

Sam, i dont like doing drawings on the computer, though thank you for the idea :)

 

Other Sam, thanks! but dont most knives get narrower toward the tip :P

 

 

i lost its bum in the scan!

 

im not sure how it is oriented for you, on Photobucket it is horizontal but i see it here as being vertical

 

CCF06012013_00001_zps048fb9d6.jpg

Edited by jameswood

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, I sort of like the one with the swage on the spine a bit better, for what it's worth. The lines of the handle look great to me. Both designs are good.

 

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would get rid of the slight nose dive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lookin' forward to it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer the second sketch to the first, though I bet if you raised the clip higher on the first it would better.

 

Are you going clipless now? You could always add a raised clip then remove it if you weren't keen later....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that is very interesting what you say about removing the clip and replacing with a smooth line, or vise versa!

 

Sam, i dont like doing drawings on the computer, though thank you for the idea :)/>

 

Other Sam, thanks! but dont most knives get narrower toward the tip :P/>

 

 

i lost its bum in the scan!

 

im not sure how it is oriented for you, on Photobucket it is horizontal but i see it here as being vertical

 

CCF06012013_00001_zps048fb9d6.jpg

 

 

I just added two lines to your doodle....

 

bitmap-4.png

 

See what I mean about just being able to remove it later if you decided it wasn't right. Personally I think that it would give some interesting detail in the steel pattern.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i like what you've done there Stew, as you say it can be lopped off if i dont like it...

 

 

the first billet attempt was a dismal failure, just about everything went wrong :rolleyes:

 

another attempt at another time, im considering copping out and doing wrought san mai, i think this billet it a bit larger than i can handle, i could make it in two parts i suppose...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lookin good! Nice, clean work. :)

 

Is it pattern weld?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks and yes, about 1000 layers of random, its very subtle, i etched it at 180 belt finish and you struggle to see anything, i hope its clearer at 1500 grit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking very good there. I'm excited for this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well...what grit are you at? In my experience, 400 is optimum most of the time. Any higher and it seems you lose too much surface area for the acid to bite correctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Luke, 400 to 600 grit seems to etch best, IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

heat treated? I missed that part - they just don't show up right until after heat treatment...

nice design.

kc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The blade has to be clean, any little bit of oil, hard water stain, anything on the surface will cause issues. Try making a fresh batch of acid up, oil tends to accumulate on the surface of the acid and can spot the blade when you put it in. The container you put the acid in must be clean too. As Kevin noted, hardened steel has better contrast than unhardened. The strength of the acid solution has, I think, something to do with what grit you can take it too. No point putting a mirror polished blade into an acid solution that will give the equivalent of a 400 grit finish. Finer finishes, in general, do better with a weaker solution and more cycles. However, you must remove the black oxide that accumulates after every cycle and get the blade clean each time. Very fine pumice powder, Flitz, or some other fine abrasive works well for this step.

 

~Bruce~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...