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Raymond Richard

Hand forging a little dagger

20 posts in this topic

Anymore me doing a little thing turns out to be a bigger job than I planned but since that is now the way things are I'll just go along with it.

 

The first photo is the preform I forged to shape the day before I started this project.

IMG_5151.JPG

 

This photo was taken after I forged the bevel on 1/2 of the blade.

IMG_5153.JPG

 

In this photo I forged the second bevel.

IMG_5155.JPG

 

This photo was taken after I spent more time forging on both bevels. Most of the hammering was done with the cross peen on a 3 pound hammer and was later cleaned up with the flat face of a 16 ounce ball peen hammer.

IMG_5156.JPG

 

The last photo is looking down on one of the beveled edges.

IMG_5159.JPG

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Masterful work.

Edited by Troy Christianson

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Very interested in seeing this one unfold. Great stuff!

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thanks Ray. I have never really used the cross peen to forge bevels in. I have always just tilted the work and used half-face blows, and then worked the bevels up from there. I think Tim Lively's vid may still be the best visual reference for the technique I try to use.

 

I have seen a lot of people, in person and on vid and in pics, do the drawing down of bevels with the cross peen. Never seen anyone do it with a dagger or double-edged blade before. You did a great job, it appears.

 

So, after all of that, the question: do you tilt the blade a bit when using the cross peen the same way you would tilt it when using the hammer face to forge in bevels, or does it not matter with the peen?

 

thanks,

kc

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thanks Ray. I have never really used the cross peen to forge bevels in. I have always just tilted the work and used half-face blows, and then worked the bevels up from there. I think Tim Lively's vid may still be the best visual reference for the technique I try to use.

 

I have seen a lot of people, in person and on vid and in pics, do the drawing down of bevels with the cross peen. Never seen anyone do it with a dagger or double-edged blade before. You did a great job, it appears.

 

So, after all of that, the question: do you tilt the blade a bit when using the cross peen the same way you would tilt it when using the hammer face to forge in bevels, or does it not matter with the peen?

 

thanks,

kc

 

 

Kevin, As far as tilting the blade while forging I think I have tried it from time to time but I just don't think it makes any difference. As usual I probably approach hand forging all wrong. Pretty sure I leave the blade flat except when it comes time to straighten things at the end of the forging.

 

Here's a few more photo's of this knife. Used my old standby Godzilla while working on the rear end. The last photo in this group is pretty much how the knife looks right now.

 

 

IMG_5161.JPG

IMG_5162.JPG

IMG_5163.JPG

IMG_5164.JPG

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Great work. Gives me some ideas to try on my next attempt to do a double edged dagger. To all those out there who think this is an easy pattern, and it may be after you figure out how to do it, try it sometime. There are a lot of elements to it that can get away from you. It will be nice to see that one finished.

 

Doug

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Here's an old photo I took in October of 09. At the time I was into making socketed spearheads. I wanted to show the many shapes the spearhead became while I was hand forging it. There was probably 10 to 20 minutes between each time I traced the work on the big sliding door of my shop. Forging the blade of the spearhead is exactly the same as forging a dagger.

 

If you look at 10 I had just forged the bevel on the one side. 11 I had forged the second bevel which had straightened the blade out.

 

IMG_1567.JPG

Edited by Raymond Richard

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Dude .. that shape-sequence on the socketed spearhear is spot on what i have been looking for ..

*yoink* - copied !! :P

 

thanks friend :)

 

-vidar-

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I finally got around to finishing off the little dagger. Instead of using wood for scales I used a couple pieces of 1/4" thick sole leather. Not sure if it was processed differently than the normal leather. Its stiff and quite hard. One of the reason I didn't want to go with wood was the handle area was not perfectly flat and I did not want to try and grind it. After I Barge cemented both the knife and the leather I put it in my vise to put pressure on it. It made a real tight seal and then I used some iron telegraph wire WG had given me to make rivets out of. Pretty pleased with how it turned out. Also added a few photo's of the sheath making precess I use. The finally pictures of the sheath was taken after I applied the leather dye. The knife was forged out of 1084. The blade is 4 1/2" and 9 1/2" overall. Guess it isn't all that small.

IMG_5223.JPG
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IMG_5225.JPG
IMG_5227.JPG
IMG_5228.JPG

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thanks for sharing this Ray. I like the leather idea to avoid grinding.

 

I have found that, in small areas at least, you can use cold blue and some texturing to get the forged look back if you need to file something to fix it and want the, "as forged" look. cool sequence of drawings, too.

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Raymond

 

Awesome post very helpful and inspirational, thanks so much!!!

 

Kip

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thanks for sharing this Ray. I like the leather idea to avoid grinding.

 

I have found that, in small areas at least, you can use cold blue and some texturing to get the forged look back if you need to file something to fix it and want the, "as forged" look. cool sequence of drawings, too.

Kevin, That's a trick I have known for years. Cold Blue is our friend.

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I've been waiting to see this...very nice forging...turned out great

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