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making a quench tank


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it's time to upgrade from the "tank" i've been using that's obviously too small.

 

i realize that the idea is to get some 6" iron/steel pipe -- say 24" to 36" for non-sword length pieces -- and weld up a base plate on it, but i don't have easy access to pipe and i don't have a welding rig. i could pay a welder to do the simple job, but you'd be surprised how hard it is to find a single piece of 6" pipe despite living in the most populous city in the u.s.!

 

i've been brainstorming other alternatives and was thinking of cutting off one side of an adequately sized O2, CO2, or dive tank.

 

looks like i can find an aluminum dive tank for around $50 used. i'm assuming aluminum is okay and i can try to cut it myself using an angle grinder (i'm assuming there's little risk of throwing sparks around a dive tank once it's been emptied) that will save me having to pay a welder to close off a pipe.

 

would this work or are there better alternatives?

 

 

 

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For vertical quenching, not much beats a piece of pipe. I got a huge 5x6x48" rectangular pipe on ebay for pretty cheap ($32, but shipping was a beast). If you are not looking at sword sized pieces, not much beats an ammo can. A 20mm ammo can will get you 18x8x14 with a lid.

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Whatever you end up going with, it is very important to have a lid for it. Could be just a scrap piece of flat plate that fits over the end of the pipe but, you need to have it just in case you exceed the flash point of the oil. Besides, it's nice to have something to keep all the other stuff that can get in there out. Instead of a piece of pipe try looking for a large stock pot at the local thrift store. It may cost more to fill it with oil but, you time is worth something too. Anything metal, with a lid, capable of holding fluids will work. Mine is an old, metal, milk canister.

 

~Bruce~

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yeah, i found a source for new steel pipe, but it's $70 for a 36" piece and would cost another $40 for the weld.

 

i've seen the ammo can versions, but i want some depth without having more width than needed since i'm using Park$.

 

i did look on craigslist for some turkey fryers -- that's a pretty good solution that's even rigged for heating the oil! but again, that's more volume than is really necessary.

 

for now i'm still thinking about the dive tank idea.

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Ah, more details help. I've just finished up a commission for a large gladius, 25" in the blade. The tube I quenched it into would hold 2.5 gallons of Parks and would go from freezing to overheated on the first quench. Seems like the Parks oil distributes the heat much faster than other oils I've used. Downside to that is that it takes more volume per piece, otherwise the Parks gets too hot. I think that a larger diameter tube, that would hold all 5 gallons of the parks, would do the trick but, ordering another 5 gallons and having 10 total would work even better. Especially if doing my heat treating in batches instead of individual pieces. Also, rigging up some method of agitating the oil would help tremendously as well. The tube could be cold to the touch at the bottom and hot enough to burn at the top.

 

~Bruce~

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I used a large fire extinguisher that was to old to certify for compressed use. Made a top for it. It is steel. Holds about 4.5 gallons. My small tank (the first one) was made from an old oxygen tank, 6 x22", again I made a top for it. Compressed gas companies have either given them to me or charged very little for them.

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i've been looking for all kinds of tanks, but didn't think about fire extinguishers.

 

i found a fire extinguisher body that's been converted into a lamp -- just about the perfect size, with a top that even opens, but there's a hole for the cord drilled into the bottom. i'm not confident of a way that would reliably seal that hole so that it's oil-tight (jb weld? maybe have it spot welded?)... too bad, this would have been a nice $20 solution.

 

http://losangeles.craigslist.org/wst/clt/3710381443.html

 

other than that, a standard 5-gal metal paint bucket with a lid is probably the best cheap way to do it.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/380508520601

 

or just using the original pvc bucket the parks came in... of course i know i should use something that won't melt or catch afire, but...

Edited by joe pierre
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Check with your local Fire Station. Firemen are very helpful and like knives. They will either get you one or point you in the right direction. Show them what you are making. Who knows they might even become clients!

 

I am making three knives for three different firemen now and will be making more for them I am sure. I also just got a Scott pack tank that they can no longer use, going to make a forge out of it.

Edited by GBrackett
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I really like a 120mm Mortar can from a Military surplus for this very purpose. like this one http://www.armysurpluswarehouse.com/ammo-cans-storage-containers/120mm-mortar-can-2948.html

 

They hold enough oil not to over heat (around 7 gal.) and it seals well enough to be moved full (i can lay it down in my trunk if i have too.,..)

 

Hope this helps !

 

~~DJ

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I made one a month ago, had an old 80lb propane tank that couldn't get filled due to local places wanting a contract and leasing me a new one. Chopped it in half, after I filled it with soap and water first. I welded some railroad spike on the bottom for feet, inatalled a heating element and switch, sprayed sone marine grade rubber sealant on the inside, and its been doing pretty good so far. It takes about 15 minutes to take water fron 30°F to around 80°F.

IMG_20130120_173646.jpg

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the scuba tank worked quite nicely.

of course, i could have sawed through it with a skilsaw with a carbide tipped blade, but why do that when i was able to saw it by hand with a hacksaw for 2 hours?

 

Tank002_zps88a7a6ad.jpg

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A great, cheap quench tank is a soda pop keg. You can pick one that is banged up from a homebrew supply store for less than $25 usually. They are stainless, have a lid, and are long enough for anything shorter than a sword.

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A great, cheap quench tank is a soda pop keg. You can pick one that is banged up from a homebrew supply store for less than $25 usually. They are stainless, have a lid, and are long enough for anything shorter than a sword.

I think this is what Dave is talking about but, this place wants more than $25.00 for one!

http://www.midwestsupplies.com/pin-lock-5-gallon-reconditioned-keg.html

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yes, a soda can is what i consider to be a CO2 tank. i looked for those on craigslist as well. any of these options would have been okay.

 

i wish i'd been able to find something for cheap or free, but i'm happy with my converted $50 dive tank and i have the valve up on ebay, so maybe i'll make some of the money back. i should build a little stand for it to ensure it doesn't tip over one day.

 

@karter -- my arm survived okay. i wish i could say i look like popeye with all the sawing, hammer, and sword training i do, but at least it meant i wasn't really all that sore.

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ford truck gas tank with the top cut off for me if its big 5 gal plastic bucket if its not

Same here... used a valve cover for years before that....

 

For a vertical tank, I'd steer towards large steel tubing welded to a base plate. I have one I made from 3" square tube, but it only is good for one blade at a time, the oil gets too hot too quick...

 

A muffler might not be a bad idea. Plastic bucket, not too sure about that... things could meltdown catastrophically...

Edited by GEzell
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I think this is what Dave is talking about but, this place wants more than $25.00 for one!

http://www.midwestsupplies.com/pin-lock-5-gallon-reconditioned-keg.html

 

Yes, that's it, but that's a really nice one with the seals in tact so you can actually pressurize it and serve beer from it.

 

If you go to a homebrew store you'll be sure to find a few that can't hold a seal because of dents in the openings, etc. You can usually pick these up for a song, and they work just find for a quench tank.

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