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peter johnsson

The Geometry of a Longsword

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Hi all!
 
 
Today I uploaded a short video on Youtube demonstrating how geometry may be used to define the proportions of a Longsword. It is the same long sword that I am currently presenting on my home page, being prepared for the Knife Maker Show in Solingen 2013.
 
I hope it makes sense. Enjoy!
 
<iframe width="960" height="720" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/gaT3GXdr5kM?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

EDIT:

I am unable to add this video for direct watching in the post, despite the great tutorial by Dave. There has been some changes in the lay out of the editing page that makes it difficult for a computer challenged person like me to succeed with this simple task.

If you click the link about you should be able to see the video in a separate window. Sorry about this.

Please make sure you watch it in high resolution, or details will be lost in fuzziness.

 

Thanks!

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Staring at the reply box thinking; this idea is incredibly powerful - how do you say "thank you" for a gift as valuable as this?

 

Thank you!

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Thank you JS!

I am glad you find the idea inspiring.

If you do find it useful and make use of it yourself, I would be honored.

If you also mention to others from whom you learned about the method, I would also be grateful :-)

That is the the best kind of appreciation and "thank you" I could imagine.

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This concept made a big impact on me when I watched you present it on Arctic Fire. Even when I am not trying to directly apply it I am starting to think in terms of proportion when I draw knives. I don't make swords and maybe never will (*contemplative eye roll*) but I appreciate your efforts.

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Thanks Jason!

Geometry can naturally be used as easily to design knives as swords.

 

You can of curse use it to design anything you want!

The beauty of it is that once you learn the basic rules, it will allow you to structure any creative project of practical or aesthetic nature.

 

With the boundaries you set down you make yourself free. You remove a vast amount of unknowns and can instead focus on the feel and flow of your work. There is as much art as logic in how you apply these principles. Or *more* art than logic, perhaps ;-)

Even if there are rules, your intuitive feel for what is beautiful will still guide you as you cut the line with the compass.

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Nice video, Peter.

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Now i have one more very good reason to visit you in Solingen. See and handel the sword in the real world ............can´t wait to do this :)

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Peter -- I edited your post so it will show up as embedded.

 

Brilliant video. Thanks for doing the step-by-step. It's very useful to see the method as well as the underlying theory!

 

--Dave

 

PS -- "With the boundaries you set down you make yourself free." Well said, my friend.

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I finally got a free weekend to get some study time in with Roriczer & Schmuttermayers texts and I pop on here and I see this. Peter, you are an amazing and generous soul!

 

Thankyou!!!

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One of the most useful Videos / instructions I have seen . Thank you for sharing it very easy to apply it to Knife building as well.

 

Sam

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Peter,

 

This is a great video. Thanks for sharing your insight into the proportions of the long sword.

 


If you had any inclination to do something similar for distal tapers on blades I'm sure it would be equally appreciated. That kind of knowledge could really help smiths better make swords rather than simply large knives!

 

Shane

 

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Is this an Oakeshott Type XXa? Thank you for the video! This is indescribably useful.

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