Jump to content
Dave Stephens

WIP - Wolf Dagger: Cedarlore Design, Stephens Build

Recommended Posts

While I do not makes swords(too much of a coward) I have successfully used Scott's techniques to take the warp out of several uncooperative blades. Good luck on your Sword Dave. I am watching with much anticipation. Did you ever get to tackle a Moose with your skinner?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I do not makes swords(too much of a coward) I have successfully used Scott's techniques to take the warp out of several uncooperative blades. Good luck on your Sword Dave. I am watching with much anticipation. Did you ever get to tackle a Moose with your skinner?

 

Troy: You couldn't pay me enough to go on a moose hunt! I grew up semi-subsistence: Got in my life quota of being cold and wet.

 

But! Your blade has accompanied my family on every boat trip in Prince William Sound since the KITH. It's a great camp knife. We use it for everything from chopping veggies to splitting kindling on the beach!

 

-Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave, I just figured out how to salvage your grind-through - enlarge the opening until you get back to solid metal, cut a thick copper piece to fit the football shaped opening, peen it over on both sides just like a rivet, then carve faces into the copper on both sides. Should look pretty cool. Then delete these posts and claim you intended that all along...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave, I just figured out how to salvage your grind-through - enlarge the opening until you get back to solid metal, cut a thick copper piece to fit the football shaped opening, peen it over on both sides just like a rivet, then carve faces into the copper on both sides. Should look pretty cool. Then delete these posts and claim you intended that all along...

 

Tom, that is a brilliant idea!!

 

Marcel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave, I just figured out how to salvage your grind-through - enlarge the opening until you get back to solid metal, cut a thick copper piece to fit the football shaped opening, peen it over on both sides just like a rivet, then carve faces into the copper on both sides. Should look pretty cool. Then delete these posts and claim you intended that all along...

 

Great idea! I've promised the blade to a member of the forum, however. Perhaps he'll use this idea.

 

--Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, back on track on this one. Blade is done!

 

This time I HT'ed when it was still quite thick and made sure to grind it cool. No warping.

 

Here it is after grinding and polishing to 400 grit, just before etching. You'll also see the beginning of the wax carving of the guard.

 

ground and polished.jpg

 

ground and polished 2.jpg

 

And here it is etched:

 

etched.jpg

 

etched2.jpg

 

Cheers!

 

Dave

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, by the way:

 

Here's a technique to set the depth of the fuller using the jig.

 

set fuller depth.jpg

Use a square to hold a 1/16" thick shim at a 90 degree angle against the wheel. Mark the position with a fine marker.

 

set fuller depth 2.jpg

Move two shims up to the marked lines and C clamp them down (in this photo the shims haven't been moved up to the lines yet). As long as the blade is clamped 1/16" above the bottom of the angle iron, the angle iron will hit the shim stops and prevent you from grinding deeper than 1/16" of an inch (or however deep you want your fuller).

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is all beyond impressive. You sure have a better attitude than I would.


Todd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

man, can't wait for the wolf heads to start forming !

 

Dave thanks so much for sharing the technique on the fullering! So far fullering has been really elusive, this helps soo much. Thanks on behalf of many of us i think!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure you don't need me to tell you this, Dave. But it's looking great. Your determination to not let this project beat you is truly inspiring

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is inspiring. Blade looks awesome!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Impressive work and admirable perseverance, Dave! It speaks very highly of both you and David, can't wait to see the castings!

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

man, can't wait for the wolf heads to start forming !

 

Dave thanks so much for sharing the technique on the fullering! So far fullering has been really elusive, this helps soo much. Thanks on behalf of many of us i think!

 

You are quite welcome. If you haven't seen it, here's a thread on my jig.

 

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=22814&hl=

 

Keep in mind, this technique assumes you have an adjustable height work rest, like the KMG's MAPP arm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Dave and to all on this thread. I have been reading and watching all of the posts since joining, in awe and admiration of craftsmanship and talent of those who post here. Since I am new I hope I can get away with a stupid question, if you don't ask you will never learn. Dave I noticed that you ground the fuller back into the tang. Will that make the sword weak at that point. Please don't take my question as criticism, it's just dismal ignorance

James Scott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Dave and to all on this thread. I have been reading and watching all of the posts since joining, in awe and admiration of craftsmanship and talent of those who post here. Since I am new I hope I can get away with a stupid question, if you don't ask you will never learn. Dave I noticed that you ground the fuller back into the tang. Will that make the sword weak at that point. Please don't take my question as criticism, it's just dismal ignorance

James Scott

 

James: No worries! It is a very common question.

 

The answer is that, no, fullers actually don't significantly weaken a blades structure. That is the genius of the fullered blade architecture. Just as an I-Beam in construction is mostly empty space, yet still retains most of the strength of a solid beam of steel, so too a fuller stiffens and strengthens the blade almost as well as leaving that entire section as thick as the mid-line ridge (but of course, reducing weight, thickness overall).

 

In terms of the profile extending back into the tang: This is a historically accurate practice. Most Viking and Medieval swords had the fuller extend into the tang. The presence of a ricasso (flat area in front of the guard) and plunge cuts (the start of the bevels), is a relatively modern addition. Even though this is a fantasy piece, you can see from the sketch that David designed it with an influence from history.

 

Thanks for joining the conversation!

 

--Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well . . . that could have gone better. LOL!

 

So . . . I decided I needed some practice carving on the (supposed to be very easy to carve upon) machinable wax before I tried it on the actual profiled guard.

 

I drew a kinda lopsided (but still the best I could muster) version of the Celtic knot pattern that David designed onto a chunk of wax, and scratched it in with an awl.

 

photo.JPG

 

Okay, that seemed to go tolerably well. Not Jake Powning, David Delagardelle, or Jim Kelso quality (obviously), but not bad for a first try (I thought). Now all I have to do is carve in the bevel parts to create the 3D element. No problem. I've watched Jake's carving tutorial, and wax is supposed to be a lot easier to carve than wood. How bad could it be?

 

photo2.JPG

 

That bad.

 

Tossing the chunk of wax to Mouse and having her chew on it probably would have produced better results.

 

The good news, of course, is that I (still) have a lot to learn from the craft, so there's very little chance of becoming bored or arrogant! :D

 

Try again tomorrow.

 

--Dave

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That picture made my morning! :lol:

Oh well, carving is like everything else-- the first go is always rocky but once you get some practice in it gets much better...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great work on blade. Welcome to my world on the carving. Take up engraving, and be set on doing it with traditional tools that you first make yourself, and match originals in look, and the temptation is to turn the gun around.

 

Seriously, that reminds me of a famous pic of Hunter S. Thompson pointing his .357 at his typewriter (he was a writer by profession if you don't know - I assume Dave will know this).

 

great idea. Keep at it. I am engraving round 2 into a sword guard myself. make em' thick, you can grind a layer right off and start over....

 

kc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello dave!

I feel your pain! if you carve you need to keep in mind that you are in fact concerned about the material that is waste, you are working the part that wont be there in result and keeping what remains at peace. It sound vague, but i find that very important point.

 

also, as a carver, i would imagine that wax is easy to carve, while... i hate it! its oily substance that tends to lead you where you dont want to be !

 

I saw Jake gives his students to practice on triple knot, thats a good idea, its easy design where you can think forward well and aproach the trade analyticaly, i suggest you try it!

 

strong nerves man!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also Dave, you know how every craftsman knows that there is the right tool for every job ? and when you dont have the right tool a very simple task can take forever?....well its the same with carving. If you have a good set of pro chisels it is much more easier! I remember before i bought mine i used a really cheap set that i bought off a hardware store....and it drove me nuts!

 

Also have you thought of using hand dremmel tools to carve ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am in the same phase of carving waxes with you Dave,i can feel your pain...

But....

 

We wil not let the damn thing to beat us

 

Go get it Dave,I am sure about you,you're gonna make it happen mate!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...