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Belt dilemna, what do you use ?


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Hey guys. I've been buying belts from various sources . Mostly ceramics in 36 and 60 followed by zirc 120 etc etc. Some people swear by Blazes or Trizac or Jflex. You guys work a lot with forgings and steel fresh out of heat treat (scaley). What do you like the best ?

I'm just a lowly stock removal hack :P but like buying things that last.

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My last batch of belts I layed out some cash and bought the Blaze in 60, 80 and 120 plus some Trizac in 220 and 400. All I can say is "Holy !@#$" They cut faster, last longer and run way, way, way, cooler then the cheap AO belts I used to use.

 

~Bruce~

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I also like the Blaze belts, but Tru-grit has a generic version of them now called Best Value Ceramic. they are about last and cut about 80% as well as the blaze belts and at less than half the cost... I switched to these about a year ago and have been fairly happy.

 

Beyond that i use Trizact gators and Non-woven Scotch bright belts for satin finished stuff.

 

Hope this helps!

 

~~DJ

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Trizacts are undoubtedly worth every penny. They last a very long time and leave nice finishes. I'm still not settled on the expensive ceramics versus the lower cost stuff. I know they last longer.. but they are also much more expensive... and I'm not convinced they are worth the cost. I'm definitely going to try these Best Value ceramics.. that sounds like a great deal.

 

Question.... how do you guys use your scotch brite belts??? Do you just use them for satin finish over machine finish??

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Ceramics in 36,60,120, 220. Some trizacts, in A45, A30, A20, A5 and some Micron Poly in 9. I also use Scotch Brite belts in med, fine, very fine. Plain cork and felt with compounds applied to them.

 

I have gotten belts from Super Grit and Pops Knife Supply with very good customer service from both of them.

 

I use my Scotch Brites in order of grit for satin finish and as a base prior to mirror finish. I also have a set I use to start my sharpening of the edge.

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I don't mean to derail this thread on scotchbrites.. but how do you use them for a hand rubbed finish? Unless you have a special platen.. aren't you scotchbriting right across the lines of your hand sanding? It seems to only makes sense for machine finishes to me.. unless I'm mission something!

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I appreciate it. I'm going to grab some Blaze and order a few " Best Value" and check those out too.

I've used the Scotchbrites for a while. Final step after 400 and before going to the buffer to mirror finish.

They also do a nice job on doubles to prep for rust bluing,working lengthwise.

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Norton Blaze belts really are awesome. When I want to move a lot of material, I use the 36 grit version, but I never use a belt on scale or cold flux, it just ruins them and wastes a lot of belt life. I use a radial grinder to remove all the scale/flux, first. I will also use my large radial grinder to remove a lot of material on a profiled sword that needs to have the bevels ground in to reveal the pattern. It saves a lot of time and belts.

 

For anything above 80 grit, however, I prefer the J weight Klingspor J-Flex belts, (yellow with blue backing). They conform to the grinding wheel much more than the heavier Blaze belts that have a stiffer backing. If you're trying for a rounded radius at the plunge cut, the ability for the belt to conform to the slight radius you may have added to your grinding wheel is super important. They are also excellent for lenticular grinds via slack belting. They last a surprisingly long time if you don't use them for anything but metal. They load like crazy on wood/micarta/bone.

 

Luck!

 

Dave

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I agree.. I've tried both and the Trizacts are like magical gifts that continue to give. Especially once I realized that you can revive them once they start to glaze over. Just put a lot of pressure on them with some steel on edge and it kicks them back to life. I only buy a few of these a year now....

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You guys work a lot with forgings and steel fresh out of heat treat (scaley).

Fresh out of the heat-treat, I use an old dull 36 grit to take off the scale, no need to ruin a good fresh belt here.

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I've used Norax a couple of times. They leave a nice finish but they don't last long. Trizact grits have a geometry that continues to cut as it's worn down. You just have to take care of them and 'revive' them occasionally. One thing about Trizacts is that you don't want to use much pressure as they will leave scratches that are hard to get out as you progress. They aren't 'grinding' belts.. they are finishing belts and not used for material removal. Even the 300s are best used for removing the higher grit scratches from your 50s and 60s not grinding. They are good for sharpening.

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