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What everybody has said Jeff. I think Owen really nailed it.

 

A couple questions on your inspiration and your interpretation...

 

You used a Danish sword from the Reichstad Museum for your wire inlay correct? The images I've seen show heavy erosion/corrosion around almost pristine silver wire. I'm assuming the original would have been flush with the surface of the iron? I'm not bringing this up to criticize your use of raised wire as I love that look and I so badly want to get efficient and clean with it. But most use of the wire I've seen is being used for the standard look of the side by side overlay. I haven't seen a lot of inlay being done in terms of scroll/knot work like on the original..and your sword. But does anybody have examples of raised inlay similar to what you and Barta are doing?? I suppose it's hard to tell since most hilts have eroded away from the resistant non-ferrous stuff.

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Hi Scott, I did indeed use the sword you mentioned as my inspiration. Im fairly certain that the silver wire on the sword from the Reichstad is raised. The surface isn't as coroded as it initially appears. You can still make out the tiny circles from the tool used to stamp the background in several places. :)

 

Jeff

Edited by J. Helmes
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Really?! I always assumed that this was a Japanese styling being applied to Viking age stuff. Do you have further pictures of the original that you used???

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yep, everything on that one seems to have been done with care and subtlety. I am impressed by each individual component. Especially the leatherwork and carving on the chape. The reason is that I haven't noticed you doing as much of that stuff in the past (of course, I could have just missed it). Still, a lot of skills, and some seem to have grown very quickly into bloom.

 

I only hope I can pull off one in the Chinese idiom some day that is at a comparable level (some day).

kc

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A very handsome thing.

 

I would like to know more about the silver... inlay? May I ask what size wire you used? Looking at the pictures it looks almost like overlayed pierced sheet. Impressive stuff!

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Really?! I always assumed that this was a Japanese styling being applied to Viking age stuff. Do you have further pictures of the original that you used???

 

Ha .......it is the sword in the Reichstadt Museum.

 

And Jeff is absolut correct.

 

Here is a close-up of the original.

 

It is indeed a surface decoration like the early Nanako in Japanese.

 

The dots are clearly visible.

2.JPG

Edited by D.Kraft
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That is amazing. It seems so unlike anything I've seen for this time and place in swords. Thanks a lot of showing this picture. This must be the opposite side of the picture I saw as this shows way less corrosion.

 

Dan when I first saw the picture of the original it seemed that inlay was possible.. and it still does in the upper guard.. but the pommel???

 

This Reichstaadt museum certainly has a unique collection... I NEED to get there.

 

edit: Is it possible that koftgari could be done using punch marks instead of cross hatching???

Edited by Scott A. Roush
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Oh ,thats interesting Dan. I hadn't considered that . Perhaps they simply soldered on silver sheet in some areas and cut away what they wanted to remove. It makes for a good explanation for the background tool. I think similar work was possibly used on "anglo saxon " type L hilts. In that silver was soldered to the surface and a design was cut in. Well now there is something new to try. :)

Edited by J. Helmes
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Well.. :-) I just went out and tried on a practice piece. I used the same kind of punch and then textured some flattened soft silver solder and punched it in. I was only able to get it to lock by hitting it so hard that it essentially turned into a thin foil.. I essentially gilded it! It is certainly locked in though. But maybe if I used a harder silver then it would lock in without completely flattening? I could use what I just did to place non-ferrous overlays in small areas I suppose.... awesome stuff.

Edited by Scott A. Roush
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I figured the matting/texturing of the background was to obscure the overlay scoring, rather than to key it in.

Certainly overlayed sheet is a thing the used to do, and pierced as well. I think a lot of Trewhiddle style is overlayed sheet.

 

Jeff, is yours overlay or inlay?

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Dan that was my first assumption too.. mostly because I've been trying to teach this to myself and have had to use texturing to hide my own mess I made around the wires. :-) It was just a thought on the use of it for actual locking overlay...

 

I figured the matting/texturing of the background was to obscure the overlay scoring, rather than to key it in.

Edited by Scott A. Roush
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I was reading about special matting tools they used (use?) to make keying for koftgari in the eastern Himalayas (Tibet/Kham), so maybe you are onto something, Scott?

Edited by Dan P.
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