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Anyone know what this wood might be??


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Anyone know what this wood might be?

 

20130707_184157_1.jpg

 

The color is natural, and the figure's pretty nice. The wood seems very light and porous, but it plugs up abrasives like no one's business.

 

I'm figuring it will have to be stabilized.

 

Oh and for the record, those blocks are about 1.25" square by 5"...and are just sanded to 80 grit and lightly buffed with beeswax to bring out the color. With a real sanding and some work with a good oil, they'll be stunning.

 

Some kind of walnut maybe??

 

Any help is appreciated!

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looks strikingly like a mahogany family burl. typically isn't oily and cloggy though? everything else fits. you would need to stabilize anything with that much figure, no continual grain support. whatever it is you are right about how great it will finish out.

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Definitely walnut of the Juglans genus (claro and English walnuts are also in this category), it is light-weight and soft compared to the tropical woods, but makes a good handle with or without stabilizing. When I finish this wood I use the 'wicking' process... basically sand it to a high grit (600+), then very lightly dampen the surface... this causes the grain to rise... rub with 0000 steel wool until smooth, then repeat... keep repeating until the grain no longer rises, usually 3 or 4 times is enough. After that, soak in a mix of boiled linseed oil and turpentine (50%/50%) for a few hours and then wipe off the excess. Let the oil/turp soak in, then repeat until satisfied the wood will soak up no more.... other treatments can be used, but this is the one I like. After the oil has dried for a week or two finish it off with wax.

Edited by GEzell
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Definitely walnut of the Juglans genus (claro and English walnuts are also in this category), it is light-weight and soft compared to the tropical woods, but makes a good handle with or without stabilizing. When I finish this wood I use the 'wicking' process... basically sand it to a high grit (600+), then very lightly dampen the surface... this causes the grain to rise... rub with 0000 steel wool until smooth, then repeat... keep repeating until the grain no longer rises, usually 3 or 4 times is enough. After that, soak in a mix of boiled linseed oil and turpentine (50%/50%) for a few hours and then wipe off the excess. Let the oil/turp soak in, then repeat until satisfied the wood will soak up no more.... other treatments can be used, but this is the one I like. After the oil has dried for a week or two finish it off with wax.

 

Thanks guys! And thank you GEzell :). I picked up some of this stuff, and think it will make incredibly beautiful kitchen knife handles, particularly if bolstered with wenge, using nickel or stainless spacers :).

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  • 2 weeks later...

Definitely walnut of the Juglans genus (claro and English walnuts are also in this category), it is light-weight and soft compared to the tropical woods, but makes a good handle with or without stabilizing. When I finish this wood I use the 'wicking' process... basically sand it to a high grit (600+), then very lightly dampen the surface... this causes the grain to rise... rub with 0000 steel wool until smooth, then repeat... keep repeating until the grain no longer rises, usually 3 or 4 times is enough. After that, soak in a mix of boiled linseed oil and turpentine (50%/50%) for a few hours and then wipe off the excess. Let the oil/turp soak in, then repeat until satisfied the wood will soak up no more.... other treatments can be used, but this is the one I like. After the oil has dried for a week or two finish it off with wax.

I used to do this, but honestly the way you do gunstocks works just as well (grain doesn't pop as much but is half as much labor). Sand up to 240 grit then get some of whatever you will use to finish and dampen the sandpaper. Continue to sand until the whole thing looks muddy (that is the blend of oil and sawdust on there). This fills the pores of the wood and seems to help everything feel better. I keep doing that till about 600 or a 1000 grit and don't buff except on really hard woods or if you wax them. Thats how we finish gunstocks at work (albeit they don't go to 600, just stop at 400 and wax and buff).

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