Jump to content
Greg Verizhnikov

forging the blade of the Viking Age

Recommended Posts

excellent so far, thanks for sharing.

kc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice work! I'm also interested to learn if you achieved the nickel welds with traditional wet flux methods.

 

Thanks

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice work! I'm also interested to learn if you achieved the nickel welds with traditional wet flux methods.

 

Thanks

 

Dave

Dave.. I've posted a thread about it in Hot Work... but only one response. From what I'm seeing here.. I'm just going to try it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tremendous job!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you friends. Nickel welded by conventional welding with borax. I'm being welded nickel on this sword first time. Everything turned out easily.

We had to postpone this blade because of other work, but soon I hope to show the photo of the finished blade.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hello! I have not forgotten about this blade, we're doing it for a bit. To have a small overview of the mechanical and locksmith processing blade

 

IMG_4065.JPG

IMG_4068.JPG

IMG_4079.JPG

IMG_4099.JPG

IMG_4106.JPG

IMG_4126.JPG

IMG_4139.JPG

IMG_4143.JPG

IMG_4144.JPG

IMG_4151.JPG

IMG_4175.JPG

IMG_4178.JPG

IMG_4207.JPG

IMG_4209.JPG

IMG_4216.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to see this. I was actually thinking of removing my contact wheel to use as a sanding block for the fuller. How did that work for you.

 

Interesting that you use an angle grinder so much. What kind of wheel?


Great wall paper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was one of the most beautiful swords I've ever seen! I had no idea anything like that could be done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lookin' good. still coming together nicely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to see this. I was actually thinking of removing my contact wheel to use as a sanding block for the fuller. How did that work for you.

 

Interesting that you use an angle grinder so much. What kind of wheel?

 

Great wall paper.

 

The sword is coming together great!!

 

As much as I enjoyed seeing your shop wallpaper, please don't post any more naked hot chick photos. We have kids on the forum. Hope you understand (and we're American-based . . . don't poke the hornet's nest of puritan values . . . no one smiles afterwards).

 

Scott,

 

I also use an angle grinder often for swords. I use a 7" for scale removal, but a 4.5" for bevel reduction. Since the patterns I use often require material removal to reveal strata, removing a lot of material quickly (but not necessarily precisely) is a great option. Remove 75% of the material w/ angle grinder, then switch to 120 grit on the belt grinder for more precise material removal is my approach.

 

I also use my contact wheels as sanding blocks. Just makes sense. Use the same wheel for the rough cut as the precision sanding. The self-adhesive sanding strips that Don recommends in the 2012 AF videos (sorry, can't remember the dealer name ATM) works great for this, since you can order them 2" wide.

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful work. Having seen my brother grind with a hand grinder I have vowed never to do so in my lifetime. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sword is coming together great!!

 

As much as I enjoyed seeing your shop wallpaper, please don't post any more naked hot chick photos. We have kids on the forum. Hope you understand (and we're American-based . . . don't poke the hornet's nest of puritan values . . . no one smiles afterwards).

 

Scott,

 

I also use an angle grinder often for swords. I use a 7" for scale removal, but a 4.5" for bevel reduction. Since the patterns I use often require material removal to reveal strata, removing a lot of material quickly (but not necessarily precisely) is a great option. Remove 75% of the material w/ angle grinder, then switch to 120 grit on the belt grinder for more precise material removal is my approach.

 

I also use my contact wheels as sanding blocks. Just makes sense. Use the same wheel for the rough cut as the precision sanding. The self-adhesive sanding strips that Don recommends in the 2012 AF videos (sorry, can't remember the dealer name ATM) works great for this, since you can order them 2" wide.

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

I use an angle grinder as well for rough shaping and scale removal.. but never thought to use it for bevels like that. I know that Tinker Pearce uses angle grinders a lot too and I've thought about getting those 'spira-cool' things he uses. But it just seems to me that 36 grit on a flat platen gets the job done a lot faster for stuff like that.

 

Although.. recently I've discovered that the grinding wheels I get at the hardware store PALE in comparison to ones from industrial supply.... like Fastenal. First time I got Fastenal grinding wheels I couldn't believe how much more hogging they did compared to ANY brand I've bought at a hardware store. And they last longer too. So.. I guess I should use my angle grinder more often.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...