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Josh Burrell

Doghead hammer.

5 posts in this topic

I have made this hammer.

 

It weighs 3.3 Lbs and has a forge welded face and a mild steel body. The Haft is made of English Ash (felled by my grand father 60 or so years ago). the timber used here was split, not sawn to ensure the grain flows the entire length of the haft.

 

It is very lively on the face of the anvil dancing and jumping around with little effort.

 

This style of hammer is usually referred to as a "cutlers" hammer, but that's not totally accurate. they are better understood as a saw-doctors hammers and were designed originally for fine tuning circular saws with small, controlled strokes. they have been rediscovered and somewhat re-invented these days as "bladesmiths hammers". This is because the angle the head (sometimes just the face) and the haft makes the forging of bevels very ergonomic and also they are somewhat similar to the hammer style preferred by Japanese smiths which has undoubtedly helped.

 

In reality, they take some getting used to, but with practice you can produce very cleanly forged surfaces.

 

I feel I should state that they are not magic hammers! it is the smith that makes the work, not the tool.

 

but the they are beautiful, at least to my eyes.

 

DSCF2654_zps255bc0be.jpg

 

DSCF2655_zps8ad66e03.jpg

 

DSCF2652_zps6432e99d.jpg

 

The axe will be finished tomorrow and shown here- its just the best profile image I have of the hammer! honest...!

 

I would love to make more of these hammers.

 

If you would like me to make you one with forge welded faces then get I touch with me either here or though my FB page.

 

they will cost around £70.00 - £90.00 depending on weight and style.

https://www.facebook.com/JLBurrellArtistMetalsmith

 

Thank you!

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I have one just a little heavier, and one just a little lighter, and they both get a lot of use when it is time to put the bevels on a knife or sword. They are great for that sort of work. Not for general smithing, but for beveling. Looks good

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OK Professor it's time to school me! I have been seeing these type of hammers and hearing how some really like them. From the pic where the hammer is laying on the anvil it appears it is actually the angle the handle goes into the head that gives the hammers it's uniqueness. It would appear that the head will strike squarely without having to break the plane of your arm.

 

Am I looking at it correctly? Using the side of the anvil as a straight edge it appears it would strike flatly without snapping the wrist to make it hit flat. So is this why it works so well to draw out an edge?????

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OK Professor it's time to school me! I have been seeing these type of hammers and hearing how some really like them. From the pic where the hammer is laying on the anvil it appears it is actually the angle the handle goes into the head that gives the hammers it's uniqueness. It would appear that the head will strike squarely without having to break the plane of your arm.

 

Am I looking at it correctly? Using the side of the anvil as a straight edge it appears it would strike flatly without snapping the wrist to make it hit flat. So is this why it works so well to draw out an edge?????

 

yup that's the idea, it not perspective on that photo, the head and the haft are about 75 or 80 degrees to each rather than 90. it makes the angles your body makes more comfortable and relaxed when putting bevels in.

 

I put this to work over the past few days and im really happy with how it feels to forge with.

 

 

 

 

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Used one the other night to work on a santoku. They have the ability to reach further, create cleaner, more even strikes, and if you ask me are just plain steadier hammers. Got one on it's way from Sam, can't wait to use it.

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