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Water cooled belt grinder


jo_smith

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I have been interested in building a water cooler grinder. Basically building a kaiten toishi using a grinding belt. I am thinking of using a 4"x60" belt and building it so there is a water trough for the belt to run through and also have the grinder run backwards to what normal grinders to. I have a design drawn out but have yet to put it into AutoCAD. I should have a design finished by the end of the day, if all goes to plan. I am very proud to be an American, but I am also interested in trying production methods that are used around the world. I have taken quite a shine to the way the Japanese produce blades. No I am not talking about swords, I am talking about knives that are used everyday.

 

However I am wondering if it is just not worth the effort to build. I want to try grinding blades that have already been hardened and see if that will result in a better product. I am always up for an experiment and to try something fun. Also having lots of steel laying around the house to use a supply is not a concern.

 

Has anyone used or tried to build anything like this?

 

Jo

www.SilverAnvilBlades.com

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I have not tried it, but just saw this. It might work.

 

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Edited by GBrackett

”Whoever pursues righteousness and love finds life, prosperity, and honor!”

 

George Brackett

American Bladesmith's Society,

Apprentice Member

Hialeah, Florida

Blademark photo 375x75BladeMarkPunch-125-sm_zps2e740d6d.jpg

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Peter Johnsson wet grinds. Here is his post on his setup: http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=16782&hl=

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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I am wanting to do flat grinding mostly. However using a radiused piece of hard plastic I can do large hollow grinds. Is mainly to try and keep the blades a cool as possible.

 

Dave, I like that set up but I would be afraid to get my grinder soaked and shorted out.

 

I should have the rendering done in the next couple hours. Mind you it is just a very basic prototype drawing at this point

www.SilverAnvilBlades.com

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burr king makes a wet 4x60


i have built a very large wet belt grinder with a 36 inch diameter contact wheel ( urethane lined)




John,

Good to see you here again! I hope you will post another picture of the big wheel grinder.


Jan
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burr king makes a wet 4x60

i have built a very large wet belt grinder with a 36 inch diameter contact wheel ( urethane lined)

36" ? ! Photo please. How fast is it spinning ? RRRRRRRR I'll start another thread. Don't reply here

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Looks good so far. Taper the bottom like a shower pan that has the drain in one corner. Get fittings to hook it to something to take the grit out in the yard. put a butterly valve on it so the tank stays 1/3 full and let'er eat. Pretty cool.

Great. Know I'm thinking again. That aint good. :rolleyes::P

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Like I said. Thinking.

You have no tension adj. Problem

Skip the fixed mount bar where the tracking wheel is. Weld( or bolt) a piece of 3 x3 x 3/8" angle and use a solid arm on a pivot bolt. Let it pivot. You can make the whole plate longer, use multiple holes and run anything from 2 x 42 to 2 x 72 or 2 x 7000000. Make it long as you need.

The longer it is/the longer it lasts and the cooler it stays.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30121645@N08/9531044611/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30121645@N08/9533824708/

Edited by Doug Ward
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The heavier that tension bar is the less vibration you get.Use a bigass bolt and as fine a thread adjuster for the wheel as you can find. I wasn't able to get one here so I improvised.1 full turn will throw the belt clean off my machine. Think fine thread. You want 40-50 lbs pressure pulling (or pushing) on that arm at the point of the tracking wheel.

For reference my bar is 4 x 1.25 and the tracking wheel is 3 inch diameter and 3.5" wide. You want the tracking wheel at minimum 1/2' wider than the belt you run. More is better.

Edited by Doug Ward
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I watched a youtube video of a japanese swordsmith and his high tech watercooled beltgrinder was a bucket with a small hole at the bottom that dripped water where he was grinding. I've tried it, it makes a mess but does keep the blade cool. with some shielding you could tame the mess.

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I watched a youtube video of a japanese swordsmith and his high tech watercooled beltgrinder was a bucket with a small hole at the bottom that dripped water where he was grinding. I've tried it, it makes a mess but does keep the blade cool. with some shielding you could tame the mess.

Yo're in Nuevo Inglaterra. Hook yours to the hot water heater.

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burr king makes a wet 4x60

i have built a very large wet belt grinder with a 36 inch diameter contact wheel ( urethane lined)

 

JOHN!!! good to see you here again.

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

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The tracking system is one I have used before and it is what is on my current grinder now and it works awesome. I am still in the stages on working out the tension and I am thinking I will set some type of tension wheel under the platen. I have a 2x72 grinder that I am working on now but it is a setup in a way that I don't think water will work on very well.

 

Here is my 2x72" grinder:

 

grinder 3D s.jpg

grinder 3D 2s.jpg

www.SilverAnvilBlades.com

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The tracking wheel is also the tension wheel. The wheel on top is the tracking and tension wheel. I have used this setup before, just have to be somewhat close to start with. Plus this is the prototype too, so I am sure there will be bugs to work out.

www.SilverAnvilBlades.com

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  • 2 months later...

My 2 cents.....I've been wet grinding knives for 15 years with a 2x72. At first I tried all kinds of misting settups, even put machinist's surfactants in the water. I got tired of the mess pretty quick. My solution amounted to a tank above that drips water, via a copper tube, onto an arm mounted sponge that rotates down onto the belt. The sponge is key to using much less water.

In front of the sponge I have a drop down hard plastic sheet that nearly touches the belt, this catches most of what spray does make it off the belt.

Originaly I just used water-cool only to take any chance out of challenging the heat treated edge. But for years now I've used it for everything - it reduces the abrasive dust to nearly nothing.

When I am ready to do a heat treatment I usually grind about 400 knives in a batch using a 50 grit blaze belt at top speed (stock removal, small tools). This much grinding usually goes through one 2x2x3 piece of sponge, and the bulk of the water collects in a bucket below the belt, I just hoist it back up to where it came from.

When I am doing that much grinding at once I put on a vest made of of oil cloth, but for normal day to day grinding it's a minor amount of water that's coming at me. The main down side to me isn't water spray - it's having to constantly dry blades thoroughly as I'm shaping them, but I find it quite worth it.

Del

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In any case - it makes sense to think of most closed housing with a drain system. Look, for example, for machine tools for working stone - they work only with water - never without it.

Otherwise everything around will be very messy.

(Opinion)

WBR, Vladislav.

 

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