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nprovos

Cullen's Knife: Experiment with Wolf's Tooth Pattern WIP

52 posts in this topic

Here is my first experiment with the Wolf's Tooth pattern. 1000 layers of 1095/15n20 from the end of a billet and W1 for the cutting edge. I'll finish it with a simple copper bolster and wood handle. Unfortunately, there is a little welding flaw that did not grind out.

 

CullensKnife 3.jpg

CullensKnife 4.jpg

CullensKnife 2.jpg

 

Let me know what you think.

 

Niels

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i think it looks awesome, as to the weld flaw I say rustic charm no charge!!!

 

Kip

Edited by Kip Kaiser

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Nice! Is it all forged in, then?

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Yes, I forged the teeth on both sides and then matched them by extra fullering where the spacing was off.

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nice for the first try.

And if you really don´t like the welding flaw.

 

xpost-26610-0-66822500-1377394605.jpg.pagespeed.ic.AGo84wHQci.jpg

 

I think it will still looking good.

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good stuff, Niels. I think I would grind the weld flaw out as suggested, but it is not a big issue if you don't. Not in this sort of piece, anyway.

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I really like the 'eye' in the middle. Depending on where it's going, I like the weld flaw. It adds to the charm, at least to me (but I totally understand wanting nothing to do with it!).

 

John

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It's sort of a catch-22. I am not happy about the welding flaw but I would also not be happy with the taper after regrinding the profile ;-) I might try to fill it with low-temperature silver solder.

 

Niels.

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That high layer count pattern is great contrast to the w-2! Slick profile

Thanks

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I documented the repair process, i.e. filling the welding flaw with low temperature silver solder, in my inaugural Forge Diaries: Episode 1 on Youtube:

 

 

The motivation behind the Forge Diaries is to allow me to post more frequently video updates while I work on larger projects. They are supposed to be rough and unpolished. And I intend to show failures as well as successes.

 

Let me know what you think.

 

Niels.

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I love your Video's Niels, going to follow them for sure! you say rough and unpolished but I still think it's really well done and wish I could do something half that nice :wacko:

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Beautiful blade Niels.... Love the high layer spine.

 

The little weld doesn't bother me as much as that big .. eye as John called it. What happened there? Almost looks like it had a dab of clay....

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It's some kind of differential hardening effect. There are more subtle shadows around the other teeth. It also looks like there might be some alloy banding. Not really sure. I get some of these artifacts every time I quench W1 in oil.

 

Niels.

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After coming back from Axe & Sax in Oakland, I had to try the wolf's tooth approach that Owen Bush demonstrated. Here is the first experimental billet - before and after forge welding:

 

wolfstooth1.jpg

wolfstooth2.jpg

 

The teeth are from wrought iron and the four twisted bars were from scraps I had lying around.

 

Niels

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Mmmm,flaw? If I could do that half as well I'D be happy, (one of these days I'll post some of my flaws!)

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Wow, that is stunning. How did you cut the teeth in the parent (edge) bar? I like how exaggerated the teeth are. If I remember right, Owen's were maybe half that length!

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Very nice, I kinda wanna know what it's gonna become? and if you forge the bevels in... if the teeth will get stretched out even more :D hehe twisted fang Seax!

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I cut the teeth with a bandsaw and then opened them up with a cut-off wheel. The teeth are about 1/2in long. Eventually, this is going to become some kind of sax. Before further forging I will do some grinding to control the pattern.

 

Niels.

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When I forged this at low orange today, the wrought iron delaminated

 

wrought1.jpg

 

I patched it back together but it was a little bit of a surprise.

 

Niels.

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And here is the finished blade. You can see where I used different types of wrought.

 

0P4A0005.jpg

 

Niels.

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Sure looks interesting, don't think I'll be trying that in a hurry! With me, Murphy's Law (ammended) is always a reality... Think I have two left thumbs.

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I love the fang like look of the teeth as the blade bends.

Also the decarb haze that the teeth are pulling from the edge steel.

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