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Vinegaroon Experiment

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It's been a while since I've finished anything (months?) so I thought I would throw a handle on the knife I was experimenting on with a rice and sawdust patina. In the spirit of the project, I used some old oak flooring as the handle, seen beneath the knife for reference. This one is just going to be a shop knife, as it did not turn out that well. The fit is rather poor, and the oak is less friendly to work than I had hoped after it sitting around for a year in the damp shadows of my basement.

 

Since I have so much of the flooring, I thought I could make it useful by dying it with a vinegaroon. Here's the recipe I used (winged it)

 

-Dust from my grinder and a piece of old brillo pad from my home made FeCl experiment wetted with tap water and left to sit in a partially sealed bottle for 4 days

-Drained the rusty mixture of the little water that remained through a coffee filter to preserve the good stuff it cultivated (rust)

-Replaced the metal in the bottle and filled with distilled white vinegar

-Left to sit for 4 more days until the vinegar stopped bubbling

-At this point, the vinegar was clear again and all the rusty goodness settled to the bottom

-Agitated thoroughly and strained through another coffee filter

-Wiped solution onto wood with a clean rag to sit for a few minutes, then dry

 

This is the result, a nice dark wood patina with some of the grain showing through. After the vinegaroon cured for a few hours, I sanded with 600# and wiped with linseed oil, then heated gently with a torch to let it soak in. Another thin top coat of oil, and I was done.

 

Is this what vinegaroon is supposed to look like on wood?

 

 

Cheers!

 

John

Finished.png

Handle.png

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Pics are hard to tell in my experience it will make oak a blackish blue but Iif you want jet black try alternating black tea (orange pekoe or earl grey) vingaroon.

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What the vinegaroon (wait a minute, I thought a vinegaroon was another name for a whip scorpion) looks like will depend on the species of wood and how old the mixture it. Woods with high tannin content will turn really dark with a fresh mix and various shades of gray or generally dark with older stuff. Other woods will turn brown or even green (silver maple with fresh turns brown, grey if the mix is older). I've recently heard that lye (and maybe ammonia) will make brown on maple with older vinegaroon.

It will also generally darken (often to black) leather as well.

It doesn't necessarily take rust to make vinegaroon, I've made it with clean steel wool.

 

ron

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That is probably about what you can expect from Oak and vinegaroon! Oak tends to go dark / black with just clear water. The iron that is in the vinegaroon mixture will only make that more pronounced.

 

I did carpentry work from the age of 14 till I got my back hurt. After I got hurt and unable to do the real heavy lifting anymore, I did a lot of furniture making and used Red Oak quite a bit! You always have to be careful with Oak wood you can't even get sweat on it and leave it. If you wipe it off right away it will only leave a surface mark that usually comes out with sanding but if you don't get the moisture off of it and allow it to dry, the stain will go deep into the wood. As previously mentioned, Oak has a lot of natural tanic acid in it.

 

Take a scrap of the Oak wood you used as a handle and paint a coat of water on it, don't wipe it off just let it dry. Overnight it will turn gray to black depending on what is in your water!

 

We have a river here locally called Blackwater River. It gets its name because of the dark looking water. The dark color is caused by the great amount of Oak trees that line the river. The leaves that fall off of the Oaks turn the water black, they eventually settle to the bottom and create a layer of mud. Even though we have predominately a sandy soil around here. Any area that doesn't have a fast enough current to keep the bottom flushed you will find that mud and it is full of tanic acid!

Edited by C Craft
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Sorry about the quality of the pictures, the lighting was playing tricks on me again -_- I'm glad that this is what it is supposed to look like, and I was shocked at how fast the tannins reacted. In a matter of seconds, it was already blackened with streaks of grey. After a few days, it now looks even better (at least to me), the textures a little more defined. I only wish I had taken the time to finish it a little better before coating it with the vinegaroon and oil, but it's going to get abused fairly hard, so I suppose it's alright. Thanks for the feedback!

 

John

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<p>Here are some recent pictures of Vinegaroon on White Oak.</p>

<p> </p>

<p>First off, just dipped, left a few minutes, dried and 1 coat of Teak Oil.</p>

<p>Vinegaroon Test.jpg</p>

<p> </p>

<p>Next up, a hammer handle, treated with Vinegaroon then sanded back so that the stain remained in the grain of the White Oak.  Several coats of Teak Oil on this one and a much finer finish.</p>

<p>Vinegaroon two.jpg</p>

<p> </p>

<p>(Edit) P.S.  Any wood high in tannins will work with the vinegaroon, not just Oak.  Try some Cherry wood, if you have any!</p>

<p> </p>

<p>~Bruce~</p>

Edited by B. Norris

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Why does the Text Format show up when I edit the post and, more important, how can it not?

 

~Bruce~

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It does that to me too, dunno why. The way for it not to happen is to hit "edit", then hit "use full editor." I have yet to get it to let me edit quoted posts...

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I figured I would revive this old post. 

I once had old vinegaroon that stained maple brown, but turned oak black. In fact I died leather black and the curly maple handle brown for a seax I made. After a while I assume it lost its acidity, and so I added more vinegar just recently. Now it turns everything black. Oak, maple, and it even turns basswood a dark shade of grey and pine light grey. 

 

I made two concoctions, the revived old one with more rust than iron, and a new one with iron shop dust. They both look about the same. What's the secret? Thanks in advance! 

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