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Wedding Sword


Richard van Dijk

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Hi All

 

This sword is going to be used in a wedding ceremony, the bride has a broom and the groom the sword, they will cross these and then they are married, the design of the sword is based on a few swords they had seen in Russia.

 

Again the blade was forged from a large Sheffield stamped file, this stuff was nice have a look at the close up of the blade you can see the crystal structure.

 

Total length 27.6 inch (69cm) Blade 21.6 inch (54cm)

Guard and pommel forged from an old butchers shop rail (mild)

The ends of the S guard have harts carved in it, the handle is a frame handle with brass spacers, walnut scales.

POB 2.8 inch (7cm) from guard

 

Richard

 

 

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Richard van Dijk
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Absolutly beautifull!

To become old and wise... You first have to survive being young and foolish! ;) Ikisu.blogsot.com. Email; milesikisu@gmail.com mobile: +27784653651

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I LOVE it!

 

 

The construction of the handle is curious.... I guess thats the best way to allow for the guard to be in place? In any case seems like it would be a real trial to get that done.

I have always thought that one man of tolerable abilities may work great changes, and accomplish great affairs among mankind, if he first forms a good plan....

- Benjamin Franklin

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Gorgeous!

"Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising

I came singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.

To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking:

Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall!"

J.R.R Tolkien

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This is wonderful. Richard.. I guess I've missed out on other pieces you've done that were forged from these Sheffield stamped files. So I take it they are Sheffield crucible steel and cast? If so.. I didn't realize this kind of crucible steel showed patterning. I've always thought European crucible steel was pretty.... boring??

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I like it. It looks a lot like a kriegsmesser. that is a good thing, though.

lot of work lately and it all looks nice!

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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Thank you gus.

 

Phil

Frame handles were used quite a bit, and they are not all that difficult to make, it also made it easier to get the pommel from that shape attached.

 

Scott

Where you guys are living you are very are spoiled, you can get just about any steel you want there fore a reasonable price, the firms who sell steel here carry only a very limited selection.

In the past I used to get steel from the US but by the time you ship it to New Zealand it gets unaffordable .

A lot of the old Sheffield files seem to be W1, I can water quench them without much troubles.

This one was a bit of a surprice though.

 

Richard

Richard van Dijk
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Thank you gus.

 

Phil

Frame handles were used quite a bit, and they are not all that difficult to make, it also made it easier to get the pommel from that shape attached.

 

Scott

Where you guys are living you are very are spoiled, you can get just about any steel you want there fore a reasonable price, the firms who sell steel here carry only a very limited selection.

In the past I used to get steel from the US but by the time you ship it to New Zealand it gets unaffordable .

A lot of the old Sheffield files seem to be W1, I can water quench them without much troubles.

This one was a bit of a surprice though.

 

Richard

Ahh.. I assumed that this was an old file and maybe was crucible steel...

 

Did you multiple quench or take it through a lot normalizing cycles? I wonder if it is alloy banding??? Doesn't matter.. it is a beautiful blade.

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the file may have been double or triple shear steel - some of the old Sheffield tool houses made their own shear steel up until the 50's i think; my dad had a bar stamped 'double shear' that he picked up in the mid 60's

 

i'm intrigued by the cloudiness and regularity of the hardening pattern (if that's what it is) - looks like fairly large gunome, which is not a pattern i've ever seen form in an auto-hamon.

 

very nice work all round...

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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  • 2 weeks later...

Exemplary piece, love frame hilt sword hilts more than any other.

The scabbard is also worthy of note, very nice package all around.

 

Someday grandchildren will be meeting it and regarding it with awe.

Randal

www.rhgraham.simpl.com

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Many old files had an additional process that's too often forgotten these days, often, regardless of the steel manufacture method, ie shear or blister, they were also pack carburised as a part of the heat treatment process or as pre ht step, after the teeth were added.

Often used fairly intense and reactive chemicals in the pack, I have always believed this left a chemical imprint in the steel which could be seen in instances where the teeth were removed and the files reforged as heat treated tools, knives, swords, whatever.

 

Many of my early knives with hamon were made from old files and displayed pattern than many misstook for hada. Also had some knives look very much like fine pattern wootz when highly polished.

 

A few file manufacturers still use a variation on the pack process.

Randal

www.rhgraham.simpl.com

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