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Jeroen Zuiderwijk

Axe evolution? (post viking times)

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I've got a pretty good view of the developement of axes right up to the end of the Viking period. But right after that, I couldn't tell if an axe was 50 year old or 500 years (unless it's very clearly machine made). Is there are good resource that can be used to place various types and styles in different periods and areas?

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Jeroen,it's kinda a million-dollar question...

 

Here's a link,http://arheolog.by/viewtopic.php?f=40&t=523,that'll take you to some cool photos,anyway...

 

It's an axe classification fairly recently put together by Vasilii Korshun.It is based on the finds in Eastern/Central Europe,made by semi-legal,professional hunters after the artifacts,many of whom cooperate with legit,and less-than legit,professional arhaeologists.

(The artifacts in those parts are too plentiful for the(severely underfunded) science to collate,and people have to make a living somehow,et c.,so,it's very decent of them anyhow,to share the photos of their finds).

 

The classification is cross-referenced to Petersen,and Kirpichnikov both.(The former you surely have,the latter maybe you could ask Jeff P. for,as i lost mine with my last comp).

Using an electronic translator you can get the jist of the document,and i could try to clarify some too,if need be.

The russian for Century is "Bek",and really,there's not much info there beyond that,and even that is...somewhat arbitrary...

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You've probably come across this already, but again it's a link that'll take you to some cool photos of French regional patterns.

 

http://www.en.charpentiers.culture.fr/tools/regionaldiversity/diversityofbroadaxes#

 

And another great site; http://www.forum-outils-anciens.com/f83-Les-Haches-Doloires.htm

 

Maybe a bit too recent in the main, but I hope it's of some help.

 

Regards

 

Thom

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Thom,thank you much,there's some really pertinent info in those links(even to a non-French speaker!:).

 

 

 

The single,reliable,classification does not exist,alas(in my opinion).


But the remaining,culturally-alive,current axes in the trades,offer a clear path(-s)to follow to untangle the history of European axes.


So i was very pleased to see that you seem to be of a similar view,to look for traces in among the remaining "traditional" tooling/it's use.

Jeroen,i'm sorry if this has muddled your thread some.I'll quit,but can't resist posting a link to this,a friend's compilation of French axes images:http://bushcraftru.com/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=291

It originates from this site:http://saintsulpicelauriere.wordpress.com/lieux-et-monuments/

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There's a book called "Das Werkzeug des Zimmermanns" (ISBN 3-88746-070-7) which has lots of images of axes from the 15th-20th centuries, no typology as such but good examples.

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There's another one, "Les Haches" by Daniel Boucard, published by Jean Cyrille Godefroy. In French and I don't think there's an english text version available, but just pure axe heaven.

 

Regards

 

Thom

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Don't forget Hammered Symbols on Axes and Other Forged Products, Gustl Reinthaler 2001, no ISBN. Available in English and German, has photos and line drawings of all manner of handled and swung woodworking tools from the Austro-Hungarian Empire regions of central Europe, 15th-19th centuries. The emphasis is on the decorative stampings, but it's good information.

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Thanks Jake, just hope it's of help/enjoyment/interest to all.

 

Some links to Norwegian variations;

 

http://digitaltmuseu...ount=750&pos=10

 

Thanks Jake, just hope it's of help/enjoyment/interest to all.

 

Some links to Norwegian variations;

 

http://digitaltmuseu...ount=750&pos=10

 

http://www.miljolare.no/data/ut/album/?al_id=2085

 

Regards

 

Thom

 

Particularly those battleaxes are quite interesting. I didn't realize they still used axes so similar to Viking axes so late!

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I keep coming back to this thread for reference as my collection and interest in old (broad)axes is growing :) I've ordered "Les Haches" by Daniel Boucard, but the other books I haven't found available yet. I did find another great website, which also has dates so that's really helpful. Although it doesn't mention how the dates are established, whether they are firm dates that can be verified or just estimates. http://hobelaxt.wordpress.com/category/axte-breitbeile-aus-18-jahrhunderten-18-centuries-of-axes-18-siecles-de-haches-doloires/

At the moment I've got 4 large ones, with a 5th on it's way.


2013-11-19 23.33.31.jpg

 

The top right one is a 40cm wide blade from Auvergne, France, identical to once shown here.

 

The bottom right axe is a very heavy sheep-shoulder type, like the ones from Brittany, according to this site. I haven't weighed mine yet, but the ones on the site are 5-6kg. Mine is probably in that range too. I've started hafting it and sharpening the edge. It's definately wrought iron with a steel edge welded on. Some close-ups of this axe:

 

http://1501bc.com/files/2010_11_18/IMG_3141.JPG

http://1501bc.com/files/2010_11_18/IMG_3142.JPG

http://1501bc.com/files/2010_11_18/IMG_3143.JPG

 

You can clearly see the welds and the way it's constructed.

 

The other two are extreme size broad-axes, with blades over 50cm in length. According to the seller and this site, the top one is 18th century, the bottom probably 19th century (although similar undecorated ones are still in production by Mueller). They're both decorated, and probably from Austria.

 

2013-11-19 23.19.48.jpg

 

I've also got an old goosewing on it's way from the Balkans, which might be 18th century too.

 

And a photo that still has me drooling, axes at Museum de l'outil, in Troyes, France:

 

3158934658_2265620299_o.jpg

 

I still have to go to that museum. That is museum truly heaven for antique tool nuts like me :) Nice way to suspend them as well.

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TOO COOL!!! :D

 

Those two Austrian ones are like those discussed in the book I mentioned earlier in this thread. Reinthaler (who used to run a small axe museum himself) said he was told the pointy-ended ones were hafted longer than normal to be used as pikes when the need arose, and were also called "wolf-axes" because they were supposedly used like a pike against wolves... Dunno about that, but that's what he said he was told.

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the museum in Troyes is amazing.....

the scale of some of the axes is massive.

I've been there twice now . its worth a visit for sure .I'll be back there again , axes ,anvils, filemaking ....

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Cool! Yeah, it wouldn't be the first time tools went into battle :) Might be a bit tricky to use, as the sockets are at an angle.

 

TOO COOL!!! :D

 

Those two Austrian ones are like those discussed in the book I mentioned earlier in this thread. Reinthaler (who used to run a small axe museum himself) said he was told the pointy-ended ones were hafted longer than normal to be used as pikes when the need arose, and were also called "wolf-axes" because they were supposedly used like a pike against wolves... Dunno about that, but that's what he said he was told.

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Excellent collection Jeroen!

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