Jump to content
ImadSultan

Hunting Knife with Hamon

Recommended Posts

Hello all. New member here. Been making knives for the last few months. This is my second knife with Hamon and the best one so far. Steel is 1095 from Aldo Bruno. Let me know what you guys think. Trying to sell the knife. Will post it in the Knives for Sale section soon.

pic1.jpg

pic2.jpg

pic3.jpg

pic4.jpg

pic5.jpg

pic6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bloody heck mate! Where did all that talent come from??? Can't wait to see where you go from here!!! Nice, I realy like it a lot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ps... Tell us a bit more, (method materials etc.) amazing, sure you hav'nt been producing for many months/yrs already???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

skelitenize the handle. the edge is way to think, its like a chisle. I do my hunting knives at .030 to .040 thick before sharpening. kitchen knives .010, and folders .020. other wise it looks great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the knife a lot,it's cool,I like the handle wrap :) ,What kind of forge do you use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all. Sorry for the late reply. I've been logging in and checking my notifications almost everyday but nothing's there so this morning I decided to look at my post itself and there's all these replies I didn't know about.

@Miles: Thanks. Been making knives as a hobby for a few months now. Not very often though. This is only my second knife with a Hamon. And only the third knife that survived the quench. As far as methods go, I got the 1095 steel from newjersersteelbaron.com because it had less manganese than the 1095 from Jantz. Did the cut out using angle grinder (used cut off wheel and grinding wheel). Did the distal taper using flap when on the angle grinder. Evened everything out using my crappy 1 x 30 belt sander from Harbor Freight and also used the sander to do the grind. After grinding the bevels, draw filed to make sure the bevels are flat and there is no plunge line, then used coarse sandpaper to do the same thing I did with my file. Normalized twice and let air dry. Used Rutland's Furnace Cement for the clay coating. Applied a thin coat on the whole blade first, then did the Ashi lines on both sides, and then put the clay on the back about 1/8th of an inch. scraped the spine off all clay to minimize curvature. Heated up till bright red and a hint of orange, held it at that color till there were no shadows, then did an interrupted quench in water. Tempered in home oven twice at 350 degrees F. Could see the slight hamon even after I scraped the remaining clay off the blade after tempering. Hand sanded to either 1000 grit or 1500 grit, and started etching in vinegar first, and then lemon juice. Did etching and sanding till I got to 2000 grit paper and finished off with a lemon etch and a final rub.

 

@Thomas: Didn't skeletonize the handle because it's not a stainless steel. Didn't want all the holes in the handle getting rusted. I think I should have started with the steel slightly thinner but the edge isn't too bad. It looks like a chisel in the pics because the edge bevel is wide so there's a smaller angle. Thanks.

 

@Cook: Thanks. It's my first cord wrapped handle and I like how it turned out. The forge I made out of soft Insulating Firebricks. Used Map gas and the TS8000 by Bernzomatic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

looks like you will be a hell of a knife maker like the ham-on a lot as will

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

looks damn good to Me ,cool your having so much luck with clay quenching

try gutting your nylon cord , the real cord has 7 strands in it , when you pull that out it will lay flat

you can tighten it up by pouring boiling water over it

you did a great job

Mensi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Bruce and Mensi.

Thanks guys. Yeah I like the hamon a lot but I've cracked most of my blades so not a lot of luck there but I'm going to be building a new forge as soon as I can find a body for the forge and that should improve my odds. Mensi, I will try the pouring boiling water on the gutted cord thing sometime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely hamon. Cracking blades is part of quenching in water. If you can get some stability in your forge temps you should be able to get your percentages pretty high. It is all about the right temp and an even heat. I run my forge at the lowest PSI it will run and keep the blade moving. I am really liking what you did with the 1095, I may have to give it a try again.

The design of the knife itself isn't bad (which is to say pretty good) I look forward to seeing what you come up with in the future. Keep at it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Justin:

Yeah the design of my last forge just wasn't good for getting an even heat. Hopefully this next forge should be a lot better and I have already purchased the body for it. My next WIP will be for the forge if it works out. I really like working with 1095. I like the hamons I get with it. The hamon follows the clay patter for the most part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imad, look up salt 'pots' as an alternative for heat treating, you get even heat throughout the blade! Not that hard to make I believe! Can't remember whose post I saw it on...maybe MS Ed Caffrey, I'm not sure, maybe someone else knows?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Salt pots are a very good choice for even heat. They do require a PID and properly welded center tube. Preferably stainless. I guess my point being that even on a budget with good scrapping it is going to cost a bit. Add to that the safety factor of 1400f molten salt and it maybe isn't the best for beginners. That said if you can afford it and understand the risks (especially with potentially moist clay) it is probably the best method of heat treating for bladesmiths.

...Again though nice looking hamon. So you're doing something right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Miles and Justin:

Yeah I've read that salt pots give a good even heat but I don't have the resources to build one right now. Don't have much money to spend on it and don't have any welding stuff either. I built the forge yesterday and put a thin coat of furnace cement to immobilize the ceramic fibres. Can's afford ITC-100 right now. Waiting for the cement to dry and then will put at least another layer or the furnace cement to make sure the whole insulation is covered. Don't know how long it will take before the forge dries out. I'm guessing at least a week. I have the hamon thing down for the most part. Now I will hopefully get a more even heat so I don't crack AS MANY blades in water. I did my last kitchen knife in water into oil quench and that worked. But I still want to try a interrupted water quench with my new forge and see how it works out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ImadSultan,Where and how do you learn to rap the handle? that's cool,been wanting to try that kind of rap,just don't know how to do it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Cook: I can't find the link to the page were I learned to cord wrap a knife handle. So I will do a tutorial and post it this evening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Imad,thanks :):) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...