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A Brilliant Idea?


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Guest MPerks89

I'm not sure if this idea would work.... I need it to be critiqued by those who are more metallurgically inclined than I am (like everyone on the forum).

 

I was thinking today, would it be possible to paint an entire billet with a thick coat of AP Green so that the billet keeps it heat for longer periods of time? This would allow for the billet to be worked for longer, and as it would cool down slower, there would be a lesser chance of stress cracking and the like. (It would, however, heat up slower. But given how much time you lose per heat moving the steel to the anvil, positioning it, picking up your tools, etc., it might be well worth it.)

 

I'm assuming there's some kind of chemical that is capable of dissolving the refractory after you're all done....

 

Would this work?

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forget about this right away :)

 

several problems:

- The refractory will break into pieces the first time you strike it with hammer.

- as you're speaking of a billet I assume you want to make damascu? ... well if the APgreen get's in between the layers... say good bye to welding.

- Heat loss? ... uhm... gain more "hot time" you're coat would be needed to be really thick (half an inch at least I guess)...

- if you only coat the sides heat loss will occur anyways and as mentioned it will not hold under the hammer...

 

 

dan

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Dan's right on that -I can attest from experiance- I actually gave that a try about a year and a half ago with a bad pattern-welding experiment involving mild-steel, O-1, and satanite..never, EVER again....

 

I wanted to find a way to do things without using flux so it wouldnt spray hot acid all over the garage...coated it up, put it in the forge, pulled it out and worked it -- crack crack crack..and the welds didnt wanna stick.

 

Doh -- I figured it was back to borax, after that.. save yer' clay for hamons, mate' :-)

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A couple things that will help keep a heat longer are preheating the anvil and using a stone anvil.

 

One thing about blades is that they are thin and lose heat quickly. It is important to be "fast" with a hammer. You need to keep the anvil as close to the forge as posible.

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What Tai said. And realize that if you are using a gas forge, simply placing the anvil in front of it can sometimes keep the anvil pretty darn hot for your entire forging session.

 

John Frankl

23394[/snapback]

 

John,

that is when the neighbours arround lunch time sniff the air and say "oh, smells like roasted bladesmith for lunch again... " :)

 

yes, keep the anvil close to the forge, but in front?

 

 

 

@tai,

stone anvil? ever tried one??

what sort of stone you guess would work well?? I mean not shatter under the heat and impact?

 

dan

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Tai, what kind of stone anvil do you use?

My main anvil is a granite tombstone that simply refused to take a polish.

I rounded the edges off with diamond pads on a wet angle grinder, and now i use it standing on it's side.

It gave a ball bearing a pretty good bounce, so it is all I use. You need to hammer in the center of the stone though, if you hammer too close to the end, you will chip off the corner.

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