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Finally gonna get some steel


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Probably should have looked to do this a while back, but haven't gotten around to it as I have quite a bit of leaf spring. I'm looking to buy some steel, something I can practice welding with and maybe give a bit of a hamon. After looking around a bit, I'm considering getting a bit of 1084. Is this my best option? Is there another steel that would bring out a good pattern with it?

From what I've seen, NJ steel baron seems to be the best place to get it, and I'm astonished by the price. http://newjerseysteelbaron.com/shop/1084/

Thoughts and advice?

 

Thank you all so much,

 

Caleb.

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If you're going to try to make hamon, go for 1075. 1084 has too much manganese to make a vibrant hamon. You can get a faint hamon with 1084, but you will never get one with any vibrance. 1075 is IMO the best steel for making hamon other than W2 because it's incredibly easy to heat treat. It's also an excellent pattern welding steel.

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Is this astonishment postitive or negative ?

I'm sure it's positive, Aldo's steel is really good grade steel for really good prices compared to practically every other steel supplier out there by what I've seen.

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If you're going to try to make hamon, go for 1075. 1084 has too much manganese to make a vibrant hamon. You can get a faint hamon with 1084, but you will never get one with any vibrance. 1075 is IMO the best steel for making hamon other than W2 because it's incredibly easy to heat treat. It's also an excellent pattern welding steel.

Is it very easy to weld?
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If you're going to try to make hamon, go for 1075. 1084 has too much manganese to make a vibrant hamon. You can get a faint hamon with 1084, but you will never get one with any vibrance. 1075 is IMO the best steel for making hamon other than W2 because it's incredibly easy to heat treat. It's also an excellent pattern welding steel.

Yes.

 

It turns out the thickest I can get 1084 (that they have in stock) is .15 of an inch thick. I did find some 1080 in square bar stock: should I go for that? Or should i still do the 1075, or both?

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I called ALDO today and they do have small amounts of .25in thick 1084 available.

I am ordering some 1075 and 1084 tomorrow.

 

Caleb, take it from a beginner as well, when you get a good flat bar of .25in or less thickness "REAL" steel, your forging becomes that much better. I have three knives that I am finishing up that I forged out of a piece of 1084.

 

You don't have to waste your time and energy flattening out a coil spring or trying to beat a leaf spring in to submission only to then actually begin to forge a knife. I have been there and done that.


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I'd suggest sticking with the 1084 for now, the 1075 Aldo has needs a very fast quench (brine or parks#50) to harden fully. 1084 is not so picky and hardens nicely in canola oil. You can get a hamon with 1084, but without as much detail and activity as a shallower hardening steel will give you.

 

.15" thick is about right for most knives except kitchen knives (thinner) and big thick choppers. It is just right for hunters and edc's.

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