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Can anyone translate Japanese?


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I have no idea where to post this. If any of the moderators would like to move it, feel free.

 

I was visiting a friend last week and he pointed out his Del Cheapo Daisho on display in his office. He admited they were not that great. Then from behind the office door, he brought out his other katana.

 

He told me his father paid 30.00 for it in a pawn shop, but other than that, he didn't know much about it. I examined it, and the more I looked, the more I liked. It's a typical size, fairly thick blade, folded steel, and a genuine hamon. Real ray skin and leather wrapping on the tsuka. With the little bit I know (and I mean LITTLE), I could tell this was not a replica, and certainly no United Cutlery piece of crap. It's a serious piece of work. I have a Hanwei katana that I love, and this sword outclassed it by light years.

 

He showed me a certificate that came with it, but it was all in Japanese, which neither one of us read. I didn't think to take any pictures of it at the time, but I'm sure I can get some from him.

 

Is there anyone who can translate the certificate if I can get a picture of it?

 

Buck

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Sometimes older documents are harder. It like reading old English. Some words are not used anymore or are very specific to a thing. The Japanese have several different words for the same thing. So where as we would say bring me a glass as a generic term. The Japanese would have a specific term for the type of glass you needed. Anyway, I Have been to Japan 8 times. every time I go I bring back new steel. Mostly for cooking, We went back this past June and I brought back two different types of "ono" or hand axes. I have visited several Knife makers and all keep there techniques guarded. They are polite and will let you watch, but usually object to filming or pictures while they are working. I had one shop owner tell my wife( who is Japanese) that I couldn't use a specific fish knife because I was "gaijin" and that "gaijin" didn't know how to use those types of knives properly. It was just kind of funny to me. My wife got pissed but I just chalked it up to the Japanese being honest about things. As the guy was right. because unless you are a sushi chef no matter where you are from, you probably will not be using the knife as it was intended.

 

Anyway, let me know if you would like help with your document. Those kinds of things are always fun. we may not be able to translate it verbatim, but we can get very close.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Finally got a somewhat legible picture from my friend, and then the joys of getting it off my smart (HAH!) phone and onto my PC. At any rate, here's a picture of his certificate.

 

img_7695.jpg

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the certificate looks a little "jsl"...as in not native japanese...my more intelligent half says there are some kanji in there that are chinese, not used in japan...also it is unusual for a japanese craftsman or cutlery company not to have pride in their location...i don't see a place of creation or headquarters on there...and a single craftsman would never make an entire sword in japan...its usually about 6-8 different trades working together...unless that is just the smith under "craftsman"...i will let @Hector Velez fill in the other details as to materials and so on if you are interested...

sounds like a well mounted modern reproduction made somewhere outside of japan (in 2006)...nice clear photos of the sword and close ups of the blade, tang, and mountings will get you some critiquing on the actual quality and relationship to the traditional aesthetic from some of the more knowledgeable members i am sure...but it was probably well worth the $30!

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Thank you for the info, Next time I get together with him, I'll have to break out the digital camera (as opposed to the remedial "smart" phone), and get some good pictures. I don't think either one of us are bold enough to try to disassemble it to look at the tang though.

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if it's properly built dis-assembly is only a single bamboo peg to push out...rule #1 is don't touch the blade (for sure not with your bare hands)...and when you slide off the parts make sure you place them so you will know the order and direction they sit...you can handle the tang with your hands as you work on things...

(and note even the rotation angle of the bamboo peg, the part with more "dots" is the outside wall of the plant, the strongest, and should be towards the pommel of the sword)

you already know its not an antique so it's hard to go wrong at that price!

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