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Rob Toneguzzo

Any Archers out there?

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Hi All,

 

It has been a while since I picked up my bow as my sword build has been devouring all my spare time.

 

Anyhow I decided to take some time out and fletch up 30 arrows with broadheads and might just see if I can find a boar out behind my place...I sure need the exercise.

 

Here is my bow - A take down 55# PSE Mustang with Flemish twist string(though at my draw length it is about 60#) and a back quiver I made. Previously all my hunting was done with a 70# Martin Slayer Ext but I have gone back to traditional gear and hope to get a longbow later this year. The mustang was reasonably priced and I am very surprised with its speed and accuracy.

 

Anyhow I was wondering how many others are into bowhunting and archery...I would love to know what you shoot and see any pictures of your gear.

 

Keep safe,

Rob

IMG_2014010314520.jpg

IMG_2014010311440.jpg

Edited by Rob Toneguzzo

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Wow. I was seriously just about to start a topic about archery. Perfect timing :D

 

I've got a 45-50# Shakespeare recurve wonderbow. I've only started shooting it regularly in the past week. Unfortunately all my arrows are the ones used for compounds; I'd really like to begin making my own. Anyone have any good tutorials on fletching, arrowhead making, etc?

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Sorry but no recurve , I'm a lowly cable man. I currently shoot a Matthews Z7 Extreme set at 70# . I also just picked up an older Excalibur Exocet crossbow because I have some recuring tendonitis in my drawing shoulder so I wouldn't be dead in the water during deer season. The Z7 has a 3 arrow quiver filled with Goldtips and 2 blade Rage broadheads.

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It's been several years, since I shot archery in the SCA, but I have been playing around with the idea of getting back into archery.

 

I have 3 recurves. A 29# Bear that my dad owned as a youngster ( almost no curve left ), a 40# Shakespeare, and a 55# Ben Pearson - only one arrow left as the others ( that were not lost in the field ) were lost in moves around the US, but I made them, with pre-formed materials.

 

My first set of arrows was stained a nice Walnut brown, with a Forest Green cock feather and black hen feathers, 125 grn field points and black nocks - beautiful to look at, and great to shoot at a measured range - but the first time I went field shooting, I lost a quarter of them by the end of the first day. I learned my lesson, and the next set was Flo Orange, and looked like tracers going down range - I still lost them, but not near as fast ^_^ why sometimes I could go a month or so between a loss ( but I made 5 doz of them just in case :P so the occasional loss wasn't so bad ).

 

I have even begun speculating on the possibility of building my own fiberglass bow - if I get really ambitious I may even try to build a fiberglass version of a Penobscot bow.

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Great to hear from you guys.

 

Caleb..I just use a standard arrow fletching jig..instructions included..I just add a drop of glue to the front and rear of the fletch so it does not strip. I then spin test all arrows and align the broad heads the same way ( I use 2 blade ribtek )

 

Sorry but no recurve , I'm a lowly cable man. I currently shoot a Matthews Z7 Extreme set at 70# . I also just picked up an older Excalibur Exocet crossbow because I have some recuring tendonitis in my drawing shoulder so I wouldn't be dead in the water during deer season. The Z7 has a 3 arrow quiver filled with Goldtips and 2 blade Rage broadheads.

Nothing lowly about that mate..I know blokes who have shot many a buffalo with and Excalibur, and Mathews are great bows as you would already know.

 

Greg..I would love to see any bow you make

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Here are a few longbows of mine. The one on the left is made by Hillary Greenland and the mad looking yew bow on the right was made by a friend of mine by the name of Del Hutchison. He has an interesting site called bowyers diary where he documents all his bow making activities, successes and failures including this bow.

 

 


2-bows_zpsfa7d6387.jpg

The Greenland bow is a superb 4 laminate bow of Bamboo, Purpleheart, Pequia and Lemonwood and is 50lbs at 26",

bow-3_zps8db42415.jpg

Del's bow is superbly brilliant and 45lbs at 28". Called Bonkers and puts a smile on everyones face with its quirkyness and bendyness. Here are a few more photos,

2-handles_zps6c76fb49.jpg

It has 3 patches and 5 repairs to knot holes,

bendy-bow_zpsf50efaaf.jpg

patch_zps9fd1ffe9.jpg

patch2_zps0f9dc4b0.jpg

Oh, and a hole,

bow-hole_zps499c9786.jpg

The Greenland bow has horn nocks and the yew bow has self nocks,

two-nocks_zps3acad2fc.jpg

Looking at the bow you would think it would shoot arrows around corners, but it is a joy to use and quick. The photo below is a group of 3 arrows from about 30 feet. The Post-It note is 3" square,

3-arrows_zpse1be81f4.jpg

 

 

Rob, thats a fine looking quiver. I will make one of those for when I go to a roving shoot next as I think having it slung over your shoulder will be more comfortable than a side quiver. The last one I went to was held at Windsor Great Park with about 100 archers all shooting the longbow. I don't know how many miles we walked, but what a brilliant day out


Mick.

Edited by Mick Maxen

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I used to be Rob! Wish I still was. I shot for about 12 years before I hurt my right wrist. Don't really remember how I got the injury but the three finger release has a tendency to make the damage worse. I haven't shot in about two years.

 

Before I got hurt I was working on learning to shoot English warbows. I had trained myself up to about 75 at 31" before I had to stop. My wood shop is still full of bow building supplies and tools and more arrow components than I know what to do with. I have two boxes of peacock primaries that I'm sure the moths will get to before I do.

 

Mick I had a laminate similar to yours on my bench when I had to stop everything.. shaved a number of pounds off her and gave it to a member of the college archery club. I never did get the hang of making horn tips, the one you have sure is beautiful.

 

That being said, I've been slowly rehabilitating my wrist in the hopes of starting again. Might just get around to building a little 30lber if I find the time.

 

Adam

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A side note about quivers, a friend of mine gave me a quiver she sowed out of a pair of old jeans. Looks interesting, but it's tough and you wouldn't believe how handy the pockets are.

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I used to bow hunt though lack of free time keeps me from it now days. I shoot a 60# zebra wood Martin Duper D and a 60# laminated long bow that a Boyer friend helped me build. (Legacy Longbows) I'll have to see if I have any pics.

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What marvelous bows Mick, thanks heaps for posting the pics. That Bonkers is bizarre but amazing, would love to see it strung....sure shoots well and has great character. The longbow is beautiful and so well made. I would love to make my own longbow one day but that is a whole new skill set and will have to wait. 100 archers would be a sight to behold.

 

Hi Adam, best wishes with the recovery...I know it is not the same but have you tried a release aid if all else fails.

 

Got a pic of the quiver Caleb? Might be a good type for my boy.

 

Hi Mark, I can appreciate the lack of free time, would like to see the pics of your bows. There is something about watching a well shot arrow in flight and then sticking into a target that is addictive.

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A few years ago I was gifted a 50's centaur that was all but destroyed. No knocks,finish, to heavy of draw and out of tune. Had a blast. Walnut& mahogany tips and a zippy 45 pounds. Even with a qwickee quiver on it is awesome how light weight a long range instrument of death can be!

Caleb. Best thing I aver did learning to shoot was to spend the cash on a few well tuned arrows to learn on!

Great post rob, thanks

Hans

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A few years ago I was gifted a 50's centaur that was all but destroyed. No knocks,finish, to heavy of draw and out of tune. Had a blast. Walnut& mahogany tips and a zippy 45 pounds. Even with a qwickee quiver on it is awesome how light weight a long range instrument of death can be!

Caleb. Best thing I aver did learning to shoot was to spend the cash on a few well tuned arrows to learn on!

Great post rob, thanks

Hans

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A few years ago I was gifted a 50's centaur that was all but destroyed. No knocks,finish, to heavy of draw and out of tune. Had a blast. Walnut& mahogany tips and a zippy 45 pounds. Even with a qwickee quiver on it is awesome how light weight a long range instrument of death can be!

Caleb. Best thing I aver did learning to shoot was to spend the cash on a few well tuned arrows to learn on!

Great post rob, thanks

Hans

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Rob,

 

Click on this link and scroll down to the 18th March entry for a full draw photo and more info of the Bonkers Bow, http://bowyersdiary.blogspot.co.uk/2013_03_01_archive.html

 

The roving shoot was a good day out with the 100 archers.

There are a few fellas from my archery club who shoot warbows, that are gearing themselves up with plenty of arrows for a celebration of the battle at Agincourt in 1415. The idea is that a 1000 archers will meet in 2015 on or near the original battle field in France for a get together. There will be the usual flight shoots with heavy standard arrows and bodkins but they also plan to get quite a few people dressed in full armour advancing towards the lines of archers. The archers will be armed with rubber blunts on their arrows and will shoot at the armoured knights. Sounds like fun.

 

One fella at the club is shooting a 120lb yew bow at a full 32" draw. The sound the large 7" fletched arrows make as they leave the bow is something else.

 

Mick.

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Btw, would bamboo shafts work, of sanded even enough?

Also, I found a dead owl a few days ago: are owl feathers any good?

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I bought a PSE compound around '87, but I never did like it. I soon traded it for a Jerry Hill glass&wood longbow and never looked back. I later bought a clear glass/red elm/zebra wood Appalachian Flatbow from a maker named Guthrie. I still love it, but it's around 60# at my draw and my shoulder and elbow ain't what they were in the early 90's.

 

I have made several self bows (hickory & elm), but my last and favorite is an osage flatbow. It pulls in the 53# range. If I'm shooting, it will usually be with this one.

 

We used to have a lot of traditional / primitive archery events in the area, but it seems that most of them have died out. But back then, I shot a lot... some of the funnest times I've had.

 

So I've not quit; I still consider myself an amature bowyer, fletcher, flint knapper, archer, flintlock gun enthusiast, fly fisherman, etc., etc. It's just that I haven't been able to get away from this dang forge for about 10 years now. B)

Edited by Don Abbott

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Caleb,

 

Bamboo shafts work perfectly and are probably stronger as they will flex more. You will need to sand of the nodes/humps on the shafts. I have also read that they need heat tempering and straightening. Also people say that the fletchings are difficult to glue on and stay on. I have made some recently and I glued the feathers on, then bound them with thin thread and covered all that with varnish.

 

I have some photos somewhere that I shall post later.

 

Mick.

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Greg..I would love to see any bow you make

 

<shrug>

 

Like I said, more of something I'm speculating on - because in doing some research into archery, I have come across some 50's - 60's era studies into making the limb curves, that indicate modern mass production techniques may be building bows backwards, thus not reaching the full potential of the materials or basic shape.

 

Here is one of the last arrows - as the colors suggest, it is one from the first batch of arrows I made:

 

Arrow.jpg

 

As you can see, taking these in the field, could prove hazardous to keeping track of them, if I missed the target.

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Here ya go. 45-50 pound Shakespeare wonder bow, made over fifty years ago. image.jpg

 

And a cool pic I got at the range. image.jpg

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Also, I found a dead owl a few days ago: are owl feathers any good?

 

Don't. Not saying you can't, just that it could be very bad juju if you did.

 

Unless, you are Native American using them in a religious ritual, of have a Bird of Prey handling certificate/license the Feds tend to go **Bonkers** about that sort of thing - even if they don't come from a endangered species. They could even take the stance that you killed the bird, just to get the feathers.

 

Classic turkey feathers are cheap and more than good enough for the job, and you can get them in most any color and style you could want.

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A few bamboo arrows,

 

bamboo-6_zpsf8218009.jpg

 

bamboo-6a_zps03dc6cce.jpg

 

As you can see, I have whipped the fletchings on in case the glue gives up. The whipping under the nocks is to try and save the arrow if the nock gets shot off, hopefully the shaft won't split.

Lots of info here about making arrows, http://www.primitivearcher.com/smf/index.php#c1

 

Greg,

 

Green fletchings is brilliant camouflage in the grass, as you know. I have problems finding mine sometimes even though they are bright orange. Also they never seem to be where you think they are.

 

Mick.

Edited by Mick Maxen

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That's why my next batch of arrows were Fluorescent Orange their entire length - like I said they looked like tracers on a average day or mini laser bolts when the sun was really bright, when it was going down range.

Edited by Greg H.

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A few bamboo arrows,

 

bamboo-6_zpsf8218009.jpg

 

bamboo-6a_zps03dc6cce.jpg

 

As you can see, I have whipped the fletchings on in case the glue gives up. The whipping under the nocks is to try and save the arrow if the nock gets shot off, hopefully the shaft won't split.

Lots of info here about making arrows, http://www.primitivearcher.com/smf/index.php#c1

 

Greg,

 

Green fletchings is brilliant camouflage in the grass, as you know. I have problems finding mine sometimes even though they are bright orange. Also they never seem to be where you think they are.

 

Mick.

Quick question about bamboo arrows, must they be fully dried before being made into arrows, or does it matter? And are the heads inserted into the shafts like carbon and aluminum arrows or are they capped on like wood ones? Edited by Caleb Harris

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Caleb,

 

I think the bamboo has to be seasoned and not green. The nocks and points on these are a taper fit. It is recommended that the pith is drilled out and small wooden dowels are glued in to reinforce the ends before tapering and glueing on the points and nocks. I have not done that and they are OK. If you are going to have self nocks then the wooden dowl glued in the end is the way to go. Also the area in front of the nock will need to be whipped for extra strength.

 

Mick.

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Wow Mick great arrows, that Bonkers is a cracker...when strung all the bumps seem to fall into place..it has a nice curve..haha..thanks for the link to the arrow making info..should be heaps of stuff there for you Caleb.

 

Hey Greg, when I was hunting geese with flu flu arrows near dawn I used a firenock boy those things light up well.

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