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JoshDiMillo

Looking to start out with little to no experience

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Looks to me more like George is using an ellipse, 3.25" tall by 2.25" wide.

 

Try this in Google: site:Bladesmithsforum.com "forge design"

Or "forge build" (or any of the many other possibilities).

 

There are so many designs with all their pros, cons and how-to-builds listed on this site it is mind-blowing. Personally I love my "newly" made (August) vertical forge with a venturi like James': http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=26862&hl=

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Coat the interior cavity with Bubble Alumina Refractory Coating. That protects your fire brick and makes the forge retain heat better. My 2 brick is over two years old and still works as good as I first got it. I have cut out and lined a blower forge shell for a vertical. Due to space considerations I had to put that project on the side. Currently working on a new shop shed that will get me off the back porch.

 

When your ready for a larger forge you can use a propane tank. My next forge shell for me, I"m using a modified version of Geoff's blown burner:

 

Propane Tank.jpg

 

My Blown Blown Desgin-001.jpg

 

I attached the info so when the bug bits you can consider this version which has a low flow and PID controlled high flow side. That will help regulate forging temps better. The green box is a solenoid valve that is controlled by a PID that has a Thermal Couple measuring the internal forge temp.

 

Josh, Good luck with whatever you finally build. We are all here to help you get started. If you where in South Florida I would invite you over to meet with some other makers. We get togther about 4 or 5 times a year and share what we know.

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You can also get some ceramic refractory/kaowool at any furnace repair or hvac shop. Tell them you need a few square feet and why, offer to pay but I've always gotten it for next to nothing. You can roll that up inside a coffee can or anything and youre on your way. Then follow the other fellas advise for heat.

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You can also get some ceramic refractory/kaowool at any furnace repair or hvac shop. Tell them you need a few square feet and why, offer to pay but I've always gotten it for next to nothing. You can roll that up inside a coffee can or anything and youre on your way. Then follow the other fellas advise for heat.

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A good old paint tin makes a good forge, can't remember who built it but look in the tools section on this forum...easier you can't get!

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I only have a few more questions to go. Firstly, where can I find an anvil? Or what can I use in place of one? Secondly, would a belt sander work as a grinder or should I have both? Lastly, what kind of metal should I use to make some of my first blades?

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You can use a piece of rail road track, a piece of 3x3x18" scrap steel or larger standing upright in a bucket of sand as an anvil. I have used a large sledge hammer head before also when at a friends when we did some impromptu forging using a charcoal bbq. You could check Craig's list for one also, if you know what your buying. Get in that case about 100# one, with good edges and as flat a top as you can find. Be careful you need a lot of info and there are many things to concider when getting a used one

 

I use my 2x72 knife grinder, since I got it I can't think what working without one would be like.

 

Inexpensive steel source is old files and rasps. A very good starter steel is 1084 or some 1075. IMHO

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A belt sander makes a lot of noise, and runs a bit too slow for steel, if you are reasonably good with your hands, you can make your own belt grinder, an old washing machine motor (cheap) is the basis, you can also make your own belts for around a dollar each, if you are interested, send me your email add as I'm having trouble with PM's on the forum at the moment, my pics won't load...

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The trouble with belt sanders is that they are meant for wood. That means they usually don't have sealed bearings, and the motor case is open. Once you start generating lots of metal dust the bearing will go, unless the motor fries itself first. This is not to say it won't work for a while, of course. I started out with one. I quit using it after I discovered how much faster drawfiling is, though. Think about it that way if you want. In order of metal-removal speed, a BIG fast belt grinder is tops, followed by smaller belt grinders, followed by filing, followed by a belt sander.

 

Another thing to consider is choice of belts. Most wood-sander sized belts are not meant for metal and wear out fast. Go to http://www.trugrit.com/belts1.htm and see what they have in your belt size compared with 2x72 to get an idea.

Edited by Alan Longmire
wrong link

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Those are okay for sharpening and small blades. Try it with what you have before dropping too much cash on a grinder. I made about a hundred tomahawks using only an angle grinder to profile and files to make 'em smooth and shiny before a got a serious belt grinder. A big file used correctly is much faster that that 1x30.

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