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Jesus Hernandez

Oops, I think I drew out the nakago (tang) a bit too long...

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That is a very beautiful blade Jesus..I am very much looking forward to seeing it with the furniture

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Dear Gods that is a beast. Outstanding work, Jesus.

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Well I'm not disappointed ........Now that is just incredible...just incredible...wow

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Wow, I am blown away!!!

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Oh wow. That is going to make your customer veeerrry happy. Nice work.

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:o

 

okay, now I'm just speechless...

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Thank you, guys.

 

This is a little write-up I did on the blade for my website:

 

"This blade’s journey started conceptually from conversations with the customer and physically with trips to the mines to collect the iron ore almost six months ago. The blade was born from the earth that so generously provides us with the raw elements necessary for its crafting. In my mind, there is as much beauty in the final refined product as there is in the original raw materials.

The iron was smelted from the rocks as the first step in the refining, separating the good from the bad using techniques which our ancestors have been using for over 2000 years now. The smelting process is not perfect, just like nothing is perfect even though we strive to make it so. The raw bloom of iron needs further work to remove impurities and bring the carbon content to a range that will turn the iron into steel and thus allow it to become harder and tougher. Creating the bar of steel for this blade took over 6 kg of raw bloom initially worked into three bars of which only one survived. In looking back, I think I already knew that that particular bar was destined to become this sword. The way the metal moved under the forging hammer and nicely came together told me that. At that point the challenge came from the size of the forging. This is a massive blade and the space around the shop had to be arranged to deal with it. Yaki-ire (the hardening or quenching) is always stressful and in an instant, as the 1500 degree blade enters the water all the work from the previous months could end up in disappointment. But it did not. Not only the hardening went well, it went extremely well as the curvature produced by the quench was not only graceful but perfectly proportioned to the length of the blade. From there on everything that had been set to motion in the previous months rolled down at a steady pace, creating the koshira, saya and completing the long wrap which is what nagamaki stands for. The final blade all put together is massive and impressive. Being myself a practitioner of Japanese swordmanship who had until now only handled sword-length blades or shorter, it is impossible not to see the purpose behind this blade.

The tsuba and menuki were the key artistic elements used to reflect the theme of this blade: “Nami ni Chidori.” The struggle of the plover to keep away from the sea which hopefully honors the desires of the customer. The saya is further decorated using an original samurai family mon that depicts that idea."

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Thanks Alan, Adam and every one else.

 

I have created a webpage on my site that contains many of the pictures that I took during the making of this blade and rather than upload all those pictures here, I will post a link for those who wish to see the "in-progress" images.

 

Here is the link: http://jhbladesmith.com/craft/crafting-a-blade/nami-ni-chidori-nagamaki/

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I just viewed the page. Absolutely fantastic. I apologize for multiple posts in here, but it just keeps blowing me away.

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This is magnificent work Jesus.

I am deeply impressed.

Thank you for taking the time to document this journey.

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good to see the story that goes with it. I think that the story of the making is important to tell so people who aren't smiths will understand how much went into this, and how much of yourself and your time was committed to this.

 

It is a lovely piece, and something that will hopefully draw attention for many lifetimes. just about as far from the world of disposables and extruded plastics as one can get.

 

bravo!

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Thank you, Peter, Daniel and Kevin.

Today I will be packing this blade to put it on its way to its righteous owner which leaves with a sense of emptiness but also also a feeling of joy as I know what this will mean for the person on the receiving end.

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Jesus as always your work inspires and teaches at the same time. I feel privileged to have seen it even if only in 2D.



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stunning!!!!

I was lucky enuff to handle a blade from 12 somthing(one step below a national treasure) and it had that same basic profile in the tip area, it looked bulky but was responsive and balenced in the hands Im sure your piece is that way too

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Magnificent is the word, Peter.

Jesus, not being a swordsman, I have to ask how it would be used. Horse mounted?

 

Jim

Edited by Jim Kelso

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Thanks, Jim. I suspect that this would have been used on the ground. The handle presents to areas that are wrapped in cloth, one for each hand. The fact that both hands are so far away from each other while gripping and that the handle is so long allows for a significant amount of leverage. When held, the blade makes you feel like it would easily slice a person in two. Think about it this way: it is like a katana mounted on a pole, except the pole is half the length the normal size of a typical pole arm like the naginata.

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Yikes! Lethal elegance indeed……….

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I've said it on facebook, but I'll say it again here WOW!!!!! Like Jim K. thread I'm both inspired and depressed at the same time. Jesus I have a question. Why are the mekugi so close together? Is it historically done that way?

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That is just all kinds of awesome and impressive! There are so many details that stand out, not to mention the overwhelmingness of the totality, but I think the detail that catches my attention the most is the contrasting lacquered central wrap and raw wrap on either end. Very nice element.

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