Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Verticals aren't necessarily more efficient, they just don't have a hot spot like horizontals often do. They also keep the steel up out of the flux and crud that collects on the floor. The downside is you have to hold onto stuff the whole time, and woe unto you if you drop something in...

 

Nice job on the burner, BTW!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 82
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

You're not using a blower?

As I researched I found that the venturi burners will get the forge up to welding temp just fine and are a lot quieter than the blower type burner and don't require any power so they are pretty portable.

 

Nice job on the burner, BTW!

I can see the pro's and cons of both types of forges better now. That would be a bummer to drop a small knife blade down inside the belly of the beast! :wacko:

 

got a chance to handle the burner unit today looks like its gonna be a bad ass forge!!

Thanks again for inviting me to the Cal-Knives meeting yesterday Mike! There are some very talented people in the group including yourself! I hope to show some of my own talent once I finish this project!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Got a chance to do quite a bit of work on the forge yesterday after getting back to the shop from the Cal-Knives meeting at Mike Butchers shop! Mike was kind enough to show me around and provided a short piece of stainless steel pipe that fit's the outside of my burner body perfectly. So I cut two 2" sections to replace the pvc air intake controllers.

 

I started cutting the INS Wool to line the inside of the forge body. I found that Scissors work just fine to cut the wool. I started with two layers for the back wall of the forge.

78Ddfrr.jpg

 

Then I cut a piece to fit all the way round the diameter of the forge.

3CB1m8T.jpg

 

Next I added two layers of wool to make up the floor of the forge as well as adding the second layer of wool for the outside diameter but that is not in this picture.

9pMseiC.jpg

 

I then started working on the door. Since I didn't have any full pieces left I had to cut the sections for the door in two parts. One is much smaller because the door is not very deep to get both layers of wool in. I also needed a way to keep the wool in place so I used some of my oxy welding rod. I just tacked in to the sides of the door and it works perfectly. The welding rods are about 1 1/2" away from the inside of the forge. Once I got this done I realized that I wanted the floor of the forge to be even with the openings in the front and back. So I added one more layer to the floor.

uG85P2y.jpg

gzDVPDG.jpg

TkKRIfL.jpg

OvrpP14.jpg

 

Then using a knife and the 3/4" burner pipe I made the holes for the burners to come through. The INS wool is great to work with and can be formed very well with your fingers.

Xm471QG.jpg

 

Once all of the wool was just the way I wanted it I started getting things ready for the cast-able refractory. I just used a bucket and plastic putty knives. I actually only used the smallest one and my hands to work the refractory into the wool.

NR2fEOs.jpg

 

I mixed the refractory to a slightly runny peanut butter consistency. It seemed that if it was not a little runny it was hard to get it to stick to the wool or itself. I also used a paint brush to lightly wet the wool so the refractory would stick to it better and not dry out to fast.

a1ToenO.jpg

 

I found that by putting a small amount of refractory on my putty knife and then starting from the bottom of the walls pressing it into the wool and agitating it and rubbing it into place it would stick just fine. Then I worked up the walls layering the refractory adding more on top of the thins spots. I also turned the entire forge as I worked on the roof. Once I got about a 1/2" layer put on I added some to the left hand bottom corner so the floor curves into the wall. So as the burners push the gas into the forge from the right it will flow across the floor and up the walls making a cyclone. I hope this will help to heat up the forge evenly and not have hot spots. This was a long process but it was kind of like making mud pie as a kid or sand castles so I had fun with it. I am happy with how it turned out and now I just need to wait till tomorrow to do a very slow firing to cure the refractory. Then I will be adding the IR reflective layer and more waiting for that to cure. I will start on the dragon head tomorrow wile I am waiting for this to dry.

oXiUfDr.jpg

A9JyxP9.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Thanks again for inviting me to the Cal-Knives meeting yesterday Mike! There are some very talented people in the group including yourself! I hope to show some of my own talent once I finish this project!"

at Dave

I warned them your no slouch with a hammer..., was great to meet you in real time

forge is looking great!, save a bit of the cement to clay up a blade

~M~

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking great, Dave! I'm just about finished with my own forge build and seeing yours is making me jealous ;)

I made the mistake of not using anything pre-fabricated (read, a tank) for the housing. That, and only having hand tools to do it with. It is about as hard as you would think to cut .06" sheet with tin snips..

 

One thing I would recommend is using some bubble alumina on the floor. It is supposedly the most flux resistant thing you can find and not that bad price wise. I threw some on the walls where it meets the floor (using firebrick) to protect the IR and castable. If you have room for a small layer, it would extend the life of the forge quite a bit.

 

Cheers!

 

John

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys for the compliments! It really does help keep me motivated even more then normal knowing that you are all pulling to see this forge finished!

 

Wow Dave...if your blades are half as good as your forge we are all in for a real treat...great work there mate!

Thanks Rob! I am getting very excited to start using the forge on a few ideas I have sketched out on paper! I have three designs that are begging me to bring them to life!

 

One thing I would recommend is using some bubble alumina on the floor. It is supposedly the most flux resistant thing you can find and not that bad price wise. I threw some on the walls where it meets the floor (using firebrick) to protect the IR and castable. If you have room for a small layer, it would extend the life of the forge quite a bit.

 

Cheers!

 

John

Thanks for that tip John! I had not heard of bubble alumina before but now that I did a little research on it I think that is one of the main ingredients in the cast-able refractory I am using! The cast-able is called Kast-O-Light 3000 and my supplier said it stands up to flux better then any he has used. When I was working with the cast-able I noticed that when I would wash my tools in water there were all these little round balls floating around. Now I know what those little balls are!

Link to post
Share on other sites

More progress yesterday and today! Yesterday was a little frustrating due to the fact that I spent most of the day trying to tune the burners just right. I had one working perfectly and the other that just would not burn right in the forge. I thought I had gotten the problem narrowed down to the valve (which didn't make much sense in my brain) but I had no idea how to fix it. So I ended up sleeping on it and waiting till today to figure it out. I had a job this morning and after I went strait over to my workshop and started working on the problem. I figured out that the problem was one of the mig tips I was using did not have a clean hole and was spreading gas all over instead of a nice stream down the burner!

 

 

I did a test burn and timed how long it took to get the forge up to working temp. It took about 6 minutes for the forge to heat from dead cold to a light orange color! At the same time I heated a piece of 1/2 mild steel with the forge and it had absolutely no fire scale on it! That is a huge improvement from my old forge! I am having problems with my gas gauge at the propane bottle so I am not sure exactly what the psi was but I would say it sounds like between 10 and 15 psi. I will be getting a new gauge soon so I can give accurate numbers!

GdlNQ3D.jpg

 

Here is a look at how I mounted the burners to the forge. I used my oxy torch to shape a piece of 1/4 mild steel into a bracket and extra leg and attached the burners to it with hose clamps.

ejwGRfn.jpg

 

Here is a look at the valves and idle unit attached to the bracket with two smaller hose clamps.

SiIe4Ip.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice! That looks to be performing pretty well, I may just have to copy that! ( My blower unit does make a racket!) And I like the idler jet idea... Well done dave!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice! That looks to be performing pretty well, I may just have to copy that! ( My blower unit does make a racket!) And I like the idler jet idea... Well done dave!!

Thanks Miles! Feel free to copy away! That is why I am doing this topic.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great! Yeah, the bubble alumina stuff is strange. When I started mixing mine I had no idea it actually had solid bubbles in it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

That really looks fantastic Dave...I would be very proud of that

 

Thanks Rob! I am indeed very proud of it! I think I will be using this forge for a long long time!

 

 

Looks great! Yeah, the bubble alumina stuff is strange. When I started mixing mine I had no idea it actually had solid bubbles in it!

Yeah John, it's pretty cool to find out that what you were talking about is already in the mix i am using. There is also small bits of what look like the INS wool in the mix for extra strength too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Update time! Okay I was able to do a lot of work on the dragon head steel sculpting yesterday and I attached it to the forge and gave it a paint job today!

 

But first I wanted to mention that my burners use a jet flare at the tip. I had always understood that to make a good burner flair it was just that, flared out. As the gas comes out of the 3/4" pipe into the flare the lower pressure there makes the flame stay at the flair tip. But I had a fellow blade smith mention that he was under the impression that the flare actually curves in at the tip like a jet engine. I will have to do some more research but at the moment my burners work great with the jet flares.

4ygN4Py.jpg

 

I was also able to get a plug made for the fire box of the forge. I use some of the left over INS wool and the cast-able refractory. I will be able to place this plug inside the forge and shorten the inside length of the fire box to improve efficiency.I completely covered the INS wool with the cast-able (though I don't have a picture of it finished)

5whXR3F.jpg

JPJKhX7.jpg

 

Drum roll pleas!.......... At long last the Dragon Head Forge is complete! I have never done any sort of steel sculpture before and I am very pleased with how he turned out! I did all the shaping with a piece of 2X4 that I used my angle grinder to make a dish shape in the wood and held it in my vice. Then, ball peen hammer time!

JUhX8Vy.jpg

bNJPwMJ.jpg

LW4aWZR.jpg

 

At this point all I have left to do is do another timed test burn with my new gauge to working temp and then to welding temp. I will then add the IR reflective and do one last timed test burn to see what the difference is. So stay tuned for the final numbers and no nonsense review! B)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave you are out there man...that is absolutely fantastic...I love it..one of a kind mate....honestly that is just great.....shine on you crazy diamond!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great! That's really neat how the head came out. The plug is an excellent idea too, I might have to see if one would fit in my build ;)

Awaiting the tests!

 

John

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a great build-along. Curious to see if it will get to welding heat without further mods. I am not building another forge but have enjoyed you building yours :)

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...