Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
DFogg

Cutting test

Recommended Posts

"There was just enough Goo left on the blade to make it a slippery character. Slides right on through...... " Jimmy

 

I already had that figured out. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A cut-in... dudes, Im so there...

 

hey Oley, do what my doc told me to do... " get yer fat ass back on your bike"

:D

My bike and me are good friends, I think actually the bicycle has done more for my recovery from some stuff than anything else.

 

I like the Jungle-honey, alot...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ive been intrigued with the Jungle Honey since i saw the one you made for John Johnson... tried to talk him out of it for 10 years.. even when he was down and out that thing couldnt be pryed from his hands with any bribe or persuasion known to man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Matt :)

 

Just Emailed ye.

 

You know, J Johnson... especially when it comes to his jungle honey... has a helluva lot better grip than you'd expect from a guy who's a chef. :lol: You don't have an email address for John, do ya? I'd like to check in and see how my old buddy's doing.

 

And, John, if you happen to read this, check in, would ya? I'm back in the land of the living... at least temporarily.

 

Thanks.

 

Jimmy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Jimmy.......yer supposed to use greeeeeen bamboo ya silly.

Dried bamboo is not the "tradtional" target material. It is too stiff for the sword. Thus it doesn't simulate any body contact-which is the whole idea with bamboo and or tatami omote.

When you do get the tatami make sure to soak it in water for about 6-8 hours and then take it out and let it dry for an hour before you cut it. Too dry and it its a bugger to cut through-if you can at all. To wet and it will just sag.

And try to get Tatami omote that are new. Some of the used ones have dirt, gravel, sand, old condoms, and you might even get an old ladies broken heel tip she wasn't supposed to wearing; all ground into the fibers, making a hellashis mess on the surface of your blade.

Ok, I exagerrated... about the sand.......but you get the gist! :huh:

 

 

What a bunch of crazy old men...............

 

Wish I was there :D

 

cheers

Dan

Edited by Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

green bamboo is too easy... besides, what if the "target" is in a car?

 

:blink:

 

just kiddin...

(kinda)

 

:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey........I have 9 acres. I cut trees! :blink:

 

But if you're gonna cut tatami and bamboo, why not be consistent with what it is for-test cutting simulations. That way you can compare to a constant (or a control) instead of just going around whacking at stuff.

Same reason we cut rope...to compare to what we or others did before.

 

Otherwise our bladesmith test would be...this knife cut 200 times in rope as compared to this one that cut 17 times through a car door that compares to this one that cut 16 times through a truck door that compares to this one that broke on a pipe compared to this one that cut a 2x4 as compared to this one that cut 4 trees as compared to.............you get the picture. Its relatively meaningless. Unless you have multiple, comparative, single experiences, yourself with similar styles of blades the whole group goes out the window.

If we keep inventing new mediums with no control group-it can all get fairly meaningless for statistical/comparative purposes.

 

All that said...uhh...I still cut trees simply because it's fun :rolleyes:

 

Dan

Edited by Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crap why didn't youguys tell me you painted the Hamon on. :D:blink::P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don and Jimmy

Swinging in a tree

 

C-L-E-A-V-I-N-G

 

First comes paper

Then comes hair

 

Then comes Don...

In a rocking chair

 

:)

 

I think, therefore I cleave

 

Cleave on!

 

Vicissitude Possum

Edited by Tai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Dan...

 

Randal's right about the green bamboo. Way too easy. I grow four types of giant bamboo, including moso and gray henon. Most of what I've seen cut looks like henon (which is not gray, btw). My groves won't mature for another few years. The biggest culms are about 3 to 3 1/2 inches in diameter and maybe 30-35 feet tall.

 

The green bamboo makes for a pretty cut, but in no way presents much of a 'test' for blade or edge. A one inch dried cane is considerably more difficult to cut... at least for me... than a three inch green cane.

 

Don and I will probably eventually cut some mats... new ones... simply because they are the *standard* by which such things are measured. You might have fun watching Howard Clark's DVD about his L6 blades. Lots of mat cutting by Big Tony Alverez and others. The sword usage is beautiful. I'm impressed by the fluidity of movement, but in no way impressed by what is cut. In one thread (maybe this one) I was blathering about 'gonna cut an 18 inch diameter mat'... or 16 or 14 or whatever. Did a little research on mat cutting and found that an American smith (not anyone one I know, or have heard of), using his own blade, and with no formal training, has already cut a target made up of, IIRC, 14 mats. A good cut indeed, but not one that's impossible to duplicate. The same fellow has also cut... again IIRC... 12 mats out of 14 that were rolled as single targets standing side by side. I believe the Japanese record was 7 mats cut in the same manner.

 

The main problem I see with mat cutting is *cost*. So here I am, a poor boy, waiting for a patron to provide mats for a video demo. Send any spare shekels, rupees, yin, greenbacks or new mats to Hizzoner Don. If enough funds/mats arrive, we'll start cutting. The most difficult thing for me when cutting is to toss my walker away in such a manner that I can grip the handle on sword or jungle honey and make the cut before falling to the ground like a dead tree blown over in a heavy wind. :lol:

 

(fifteen seconds pass)

 

What?? No money coming in yet??? Tightwads!! Shell out!! Any donation over ten bucks gets a free DVD of the cutting. You'll laugh! You'll cry!! You'll send more mats/money for the sequel!!!

 

Jimmy 'No Pride' Fikes(thrusting his begging bowl at your face, crying 'give, GIVE!!') ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One Whack Jimmy

and Three Whack Tai

Just a couple of blade freaks

Letting their edge flag fly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jimmy

 

I know and converse with Tony and am quite familiar with Howards blades, those in the polishing biz and many in Japanese Budo. You should know I am in Budo as well (in a very well respected one at that, in fact the oldest extant Japanese school) thus I am extremely familiar with the whole test cutting thang and have been doing so for almost 25 years.

My post was only for a discussion of uniformity of testing materials so there are measurable and thus compatible results..... thats all. If you read between the lines, I am fan of our efforts over the Japanese efforts and can and do show our efforts will out cut theirs. I have spent tens of thousands of dollars buying, testing and destroying Japanese blades to prove it.

 

Anyway, for me the irony of your reply is that I have been saying the .....exact....... same thing as you for years in Budo circles-that their cutting material is unimpressive and have been getting slammed for saying it. <_<

Further, (and you can read my replies on E-buo and sword forum thus there are witnesses to this), I have openly made fun of my own buddies and told them their grass cutting efforts can be done with a $15.00 re-ground lawnmower blade. That a $3,000-$6,000 katana was not needed. I have kidded that I will show up with a lawn mower blade in full katana mounts (with the arbor whole remaining) I will name my blade "The Grass cutter" and do just as much cutting as they do! :D

Overall, I believe you will find me as irreverent of all the hoopla and as practical as a smith can get. For me it is budo with a hands-on-hammer approach to blade ware. Sometimes not so popular with the skirt wearing crowd but I can back up what I say on any given day.....with steel in hand, like only a blacksmith can. :D

 

Cute story

I proved a point for a couple of Japanophile students of mine who thought the Japanese sword was the be-all and end-all for bladeware. They spent the day using my Katana and naginata blades to test cut trees. After they were feeling good about themselves I said "Ok fellas, there you see what you can do with two hands and a thirty inch blade. Watch this" I then proceeded to pull out a 16 Kukri, and matched their cuts with a single hand swing with a blade half the size. It was a lesson learned for them to NOT be snobby and dismissive of other cultures efforts in steel.

 

As or the video of the large mat test cuts..I believe that was watson's angle fire stuff. Most of it was western style swords-but they were morphed blades (not period correct) with longer handles made for test cutting. I tend to look at tests as

"artificial things" these days. Most competant smiths can manipulate a profile to make the test blade cut the material better. I am far more interested in what would have been a field blade ready to use for a particular eras battlefield and then see what "it" can do. as an example: there are well established blade profiles for japanese swords in eras of their maunfacture. They are defined for use those eras. Make a blade for that era and see what it can do.

Today they are morphed (as our imagination may lead) for certain things and even then we manipulate the profile for "single test" materials.

In other words

1. narrow and flat

cuts grass better but it is a week battle blade

2. thicker with an appleseed grind from the shinogi on down (Japanese call it niku- meat)

makes for great soft and hard cutting-thus it is an overall superior blade.

 

So whats the down side? The superior, battle grade, overall superior weapon, does not cut grass as well. It would on the other hand last on a field of battle and behave...well... sort of like a real weapon should behave. The grass cutter would not. Thus the average uninformed martial artists or suburban white boy observer, can make a serious error in judgment of weaponry based on perceptions that are false.

 

I cut trees as it is far more demanding, I have also cut livestock and lamb and beef and pig for test cutting. I also stab and cut cloth wrapped beef and pig to test knives. In short, I am a little........wierd. I do it to test what I make and to test...well....me. ;)

 

Not that most people or smiths even care about all this hoo ha..... It is like a discussion of handle wrappings and furniture types for a sword handle. Most would die laughing at how persnickity we get. But tens of thousands of cuts later you can bet that my contemporaries and I are very concerned about the fit and furniture remaining tight. We even may get all snobby and picky about the styles and match ups far past the correct and traditional wraps. Maybe we're just foo-foo boys after all.

If any of this is confusing it is entirely my fault. I am a terrible writer.

 

Cheers

Dan

Edited by Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blimey, I think someone liked the design a bit. That or my eyes need a check.

 

http://www.wizards.com/dnd/images/sand_gallery/87613.jpg

 

They looks pretty much like the overall design to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...