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very old oak crotch. Warning: lots of pictures


Guest guest T

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Guest guest T

I don't know if this counts as curly oak but it has a very nice grain. In california a giant oak tree in fron of my freind's house was going down so it was cut and my freind got all of the wood for firewood. I pulled these two peices out of their wood pile and they let me have them.

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the tree must have been 5 feet across!

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crack run about 3 inches deep into the larger peice.

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the texture against the grain:

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some refuse:

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a side vew of the grain:

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top vew of the grain:

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I will post more after I start cutting the smaller peice.

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Looks like you've got a bunch of drying cracks, make sure you are careful drying them so that they do not spread or appear in any nice material.

 

//DQ

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Sometimes you can utilise a crack, don't throw any away, fill with clear resin, and when set use as normal some cracks have great character and can look really pretty! If they remove the stump, try get some of the top of the roots...

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Guest guest T

I have started to cut the second peice, it has some very interesting grain circles.

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I am having a lot of trouble with keeping the cuts straight on my table saw and burning. any ideas?

the first peice has some nice semi-formed bark in the wood that looks red when treated with oil.

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Edited by Tre Asay
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That's some beautiful figure, ya got there!

 

Burning on the tablesaw can be a matter of a dull blade, and the operator pushing too fast for the blade to grind through. Or, sideways pressure on the blade. Generally, when I'm cutting thick pieces like that, I make multiple passes, raising the blade a half-inch or so until I complete the cut.

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  • 2 weeks later...

That's some beautiful figure, ya got there!

 

Burning on the tablesaw can be a matter of a dull blade, and the operator pushing too fast for the blade to grind through. Or, sideways pressure on the blade. Generally, when I'm cutting thick pieces like that, I make multiple passes, raising the blade a half-inch or so until I complete the cut.

 

I agree Oak, is one of those things that you absolutely got to have a sharp blade, under speed can cause problems as well, as too fast. A sharp blade and let the saw do the work! Like Vaughn said you may be better off to make multiple passes, especially when cutting Oak. You need to coat the ends and let them dry all for quite a while. If it ends up being a lot of cracking going on you may want to have them professionally stabilized!

I ordered some wood from a place that sells all sorts of wood and it came coated in wax on all edges. So I have been treating some wood pieces with wax. I go around and find the old candles that the wife has sitting around throw them all in a pot and melt it down. Take one of those throw away brushes and paint it on. Hey some of it even smells good if you get the scented ones she had left. What the hey, they are just going into the trash, might as well make use of what is left!

I coat just the ends and let them dry for at least six months or so and then I coat the entire piece and let them go for at least another six months. Some wood takes longer than that too dry. Do a little research and you will then have and idea how to dry them.

That grain in that first pic is awesome!

Edited by C Craft
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Guest guest T

Thanks, I tried taking multiple passes and it is cutting straight. it is still burning though I will just have to sand off the burns. The table saw blade is still sharp I think the burning is caused by side pressure on the blade.

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The curve of the burns would support your hypothesis. The cheeks of the blade are rubbing against the side of the cut, causing friction burns. Side pressure is a common problem when you don't have a jig that to hold the wood as it moves through the blade.

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Take a look into boiling the wood as well. One hour per inch of thickness, changing water periodically, then dry gently. This should help to reduce cracking and help them dry a bit faster, since you have removed most of the sap during this process.

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  • 7 months later...
Guest guest T

I finally got around to putting some of this into a handle. I think that I am good for drying becuase the peice I used had not changed weight in 5 months. This is just treated with linseed oil so I expect that it will become darker with use. The white balance is off becuase I had to use my phone to take the pictures.

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Thank you for this post. I love the look of that oak. It is very difficult for me to justify buying exotic woods...as I realize many of those woods are harvested where the populations are relatively poor. Some are harvested legally some are not. Good choice.

 

Jan

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Guest guest T

Thank you and you are welcome. There are definetly local options for handle materials at least where I live I can usually find tree branches from landcaping for free or very cheap.

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