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Japanese blade lamination methods...


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Specifically 'honsanmai':

 

sanmai.gif

 

Would this be done in 2 steps? i.e. butt welding the edge to the core and then welding on sides? I have a feeling the answer is no. But for me it would seem easier to do it in 2 steps to avoid any kind of gap between the ha and mune pieces.

 

 

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Well..the only time I ever did something like that I did it in one step. If I tried it again I would do it in two, but doing it all at once did work (pretty well even). I did have to fight that gap you described though. Don't know how much help that is....

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Have seen it made in 3 steps ( as one traditional way---there might be other´s too)

....but now days would be easy to mig "glue" all and weld as one and remove the "glue" first hand

after initial weld..even its sure is not "traditional way"..and have to say that tamahagane will weld way better and easyer.

 

Niko

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Thanks Luke... so you just arranged all the pieces and went for it eh? It just seems like if you set the weld from one direction.. it would cause shearing from another direction!

 

Matt... Good to hear it's in that book since it is now en route towards me. Not your copy... :-)

 

Have seen it made in 3 steps ( as one traditional way---there might be other´s too)

....but now days would be easy to mig "glue" all and weld as one and remove the "glue" first hand

after initial weld..even its sure is not "traditional way"..and have to say that tamahagane will weld way better and easyer.

 

Niko

Niko... What would the third step be? It seems like if you got a good weld between the mune and ha then all you would have to do is proceed like normal san mai...

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wow... can't believe I've never seen that before. Okay.. well I guess it makes since to do it in three if you don't wire it or mig weld it all together. I'm always amazed to see them weld up scaled surfaces like that...

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Yep.

 

Thas the one method and like I said its just 3 steps.

Most of the time tech´s are easyer than we think...we have that over thinking issue..

well I do it at least and after time notice that this way too hard and go back to basic´s...old school.

 

There is slite differens what I have seen, basic tech is same but edge steel "hagane" was all ready shape like L

so the kissaki will have this steel also at small section on mune. In this or kobuse I think kissaki´s mune dosent have hard steel, sens

its bean cut to angle and forge upwards..but sens there is many schools and in them having the smiths personal idea and thought too.

...how knows them all...?

 

I think its not all skale..its staw CC and clay...looks more like slag..Staw CC prevents its stiking too hard one steel surface.

So it acts like casing over the billet...and black powder at last step was tetsuro..

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I think that that video is quite wonderful and shows a lot, the whet forging prior to folding and proper sledge hammer work , welding with a flatter .

All great hints as to how to treat the steel.

as to Tetsuro.........I await with baited breath.

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Hi.

 

Tetruro´s origin for me is unknown...hard to say for fact what was used, say 500 years ago?

But Its boric acid, iron oxide and borax...specific formula is smiths own..so all have to figure out what

portions suits. Also type of iron oxide may vary.

 

Niko

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Hello:

 

OK I have to come clean...this is the stuff I based my "steel glue" flux on...I just added a few other things to aid in welding higher alloyed stuff... Works great for simple carbon steels as is..but when you doctor it up a bit it makes welding richer alloys a whole lot easier.

 

Back when I was doing these..I would do Hon San Mai in two steps..in fact I have two Hon San Mai baldes I just finished that I will be putting up on my site today..the LAST of the Japanese blades I will be making for a very, very long time...

 

I LOVED the video..sort of rushed through the process but it showed a "different" approach from what we usually see, which I thought was delightful...

 

JPH

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