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Simon W

KITH 2014 shadow design

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When I saw this year's KITH were going to be an eastern/culture theme, I was pretty excited. I don't know much about eastern culture or design (aside from Japan), so it was going to be fun learning something new!

 

With that in mind I started pouring through the links in the signup thread & hitting Google hard. The first inspiration I had was this crystal-hilted kard. Nice shape, cool handle & the general idea I had in my head; a larger knife.

 

crystal kard 1.jpg

crystal kard 2.jpg

 

That was a good start, but why not change it up a bit, put a gentle recurve on the blade? Recurves are eastern right? I'd end up with a yataghan shaped kard, pretty neat! Well, a little more searching through Middle Eastern blade galleries & auction signs yielded the exact shape I was sketching out, a Turkish bichaq! It looks like it is true; there is nothing new under the sun!

 

jade bichaq.jpg

 

With my knife type chosen & did a bit of searching for Turkish or Ottoman metal work for the sheath fittings, where I decided to keep things simpler, a leather wrapped wood sheath with a bit of metalwork around the throat & tip, with just a bit of engraving & peircing to fancy things up. I found a pretty cool bronze platter with an interesting basket-weave type pattern (unfortunately the picture I managed to get is too small to see the details) that I used around the throat fitting, perhaps stamping it into the metal for a extra texture on the piece.

 

crystal kard 3.jpg

silver bichaq 2.jpgplatter.jpg

 

All in all it was pretty fun designing this knife. I'm not sure I'll get to starting this one anytime soon, nevermind having the skill to do the it justice, but perhaps one day!

 

Let me know if you've got comments or critiques, it would be great to hear any feedback.

 

CCF04022014_0001.jpg

 

Turkish Bishaq


10.5" (265mm) low contrast layered damascus blade with thin fuller

4.5" (115mm) walnut or olivewood handle with bronze/red brass bolster & buffalo horn pommel cap

red/brown leather wrapped wood sheath with bronze/red brass engraved & stamped fittings






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I love your design, the kard is one of my favorites as they just scream functionality...

 

I've been debating the best way to go about making the ferrule/bolster type seen here without resorting to solder...

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thats gonna look great , hell the drawing looks great!!!

I believe we will see alot of variations on the kard

I discribe a Kard as a table knife with a attitude<LOL>

~M~

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I love your design, the kard is one of my favorites as they just scream functionality...

 

I've been debating the best way to go about making the ferrule/bolster type seen here without resorting to solder...

 

In the pictures I've been going through, a lot of the kard type knives seem to have bolsters/ferrules formed like a collar out of silver or brass. Without having to solder I'd think you'd be stuck with an integral bolster or a solid formed bolster. For this project I was thinking of using a solid piece of bronze & grinding it down to shape, including a small recess for the blade to sit in at the ricasso.

 

Thanks for the comments!

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In the pictures I've been going through, a lot of the kard type knives seem to have bolsters/ferrules formed like a collar out of silver or brass. Without having to solder I'd think you'd be stuck with an integral bolster or a solid formed bolster. For this project I was thinking of using a solid piece of bronze & grinding it down to shape, including a small recess for the blade to sit in at the ricasso.

 

Thanks for the comments!

I think you are right, my desire for an alternative comes from the sad fact I am not very good at all when it comes to soldering and brazing... I just need a lot of practice before I could do it justice. I may go with an integral design instead....

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Ha! I'm finaly one up on you, George! (I 'tin' the blade where the guard sits after getting a tight fit, then tap the guard over the solder,into place, secure its possition with a vice grip heat and apply liquid flux! ) To stop solder going where not wanted, I tape the part I want to tin, and apply house hold polish, 'mr min' to the rest and let it dry,remove tape and tin

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I'm not sure I'll get to starting this one anytime soon, nevermind having the skill to do the it justice, but perhaps one day!

Just one aspect of what drives us all to make what we do, isn't it?

 

A whole bunch of complex fittings for knives, like the bolster on your sketch above, would be die sunk in two pieces and then soldered together. Left side and right side, with seams down the center-line. Hard solder (silver) and brazing are easy IMHO. I detest soft solder (low temperature.) Learning to tin (coat the surface, or surfaces, before assembly, with solder) prior to assembly is invaluable when dealing with soft solders. As is the ability to prevent the solder from adhering where you do not want it.

 

~Bruce~

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