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kibuddha4

sword HT forge

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My partner thinks we are ready to try a broadsword. I must admit that I'm really excited to try it out myself. The problem is that we don't have anything long enough to HT it in. All of our work was done in a drumbreak forge that I built, and of course that is way too small to HT a sword in. We are very limited in money right now, so buying is out of the question. Have to build. I would like a propane forge, but that might not be cost effctive. Can anyone help us out.

 

-Mike

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Thanks. Big fan. Will a 55 gal drum be long enough to HT a 45in sword?

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Guest TimCrocker

a b

Edited by TimCrocker

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The drum forge is the cat's meow :) It should be plenty long enough for the job .

Edited by Glen Moulton

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Hey Don,

I notice you have the work opening up high in the barrel. What are you doing to support your work while heat treating so that you don't get sag in the blade?

 

I'm using angle iron as a work rest but that sags too - just slower - so I had to add fire brick upright supports. My forge is only 10" I.D. Seems like the problem would be much greater with the barrel setup.

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I just hold onto the blade with tongs. I haven't had any sagging problem, but if I did, I would probably just add some stainless rod down from the to hold the blade up. Not sure why you are getting the sagging though.

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I just hold onto the blade with tongs. I haven't had any sagging problem, but if I did, I would probably just add some stainless rod down from the to hold the blade up. Not sure why you are getting the sagging though.

24067[/snapback]

 

Hmm, I built the forge with the openings higher than the floor of the forge and the weight of a long blade seems to kind of make sagging inevitable if not supported. My first mistake was laying a blade in flat side up. Been paranoid about it ever since. The last one I did, I used the angle iron as a track to stroke the blade through the hot spot in the forge. Instead of tongs I made the tang a bit longer and drilled a hole through it with a long flat bar handle loosely bolted to it. Made stroking the blade a lot easier. I'll get around to making a barrel heat treating oven one of these days - or build an electric oven ;-)

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Flat side will droop everytime. I stay edge or spine up.

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You can construct the drum forge so that it's in a vertical plane,rather than horizontal. Let the blades *hang* inside the forge. No problem with them bending at heat with such an arrangement. Quenching would be a little more difficult if you have a horizontal quench tank, but a little practice moving blade to tank would cure any clumsiness.

 

Jimmy

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You can construct the drum forge so that it's in a vertical plane,rather than horizontal.  Let the blades *hang* inside the forge.  No problem with them bending at heat with such an arrangement.  Quenching would be a little more difficult if you have a horizontal quench tank, but a little practice moving blade to tank would cure any clumsiness.

 

Jimmy

24219[/snapback]

 

I like the upright barrel idea. I tried that with my tube forge but it still had uneven heating. I think the larger diameter chamber is the way to cure that though. Probably need another burner for BTUs. Got the quench tank thing beat. Used a thick wall eight or ten inch diameter three and a half foot PVC pipe with a cap on the bottom and sunk it into the ground about a foot. Holds up well as long as you don't put the glowing steel in direct contact. I even preheated about eight gallons of mineral oil in it. I don't ever expect to do any mass heat treating so I'm not too worried about over heating the setup. Last did a 18 inch short sword and a 10 inch daggar two quenches each (5160). No complaints about the setup. I just want an oven I don't have to keep moving the blade around in

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