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"Grave Find" completed


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I wanted to take a minute and share a piece that I recently completed. This is the piece that I showed some of my steps as to how I overlay silver. The guard and pommel are both overlaid in fine silver, and the wire wrap is fine silver as well. The collars, bars, and peen block are steel. The blade was forged from L6 and has a proud midrib which has a convex grind down to a flat which transitions to the edge.

 

This piece is modeled after one that I had the opportunity to handle and document a few years ago. The challenges in this project were quite extensive. The blade was very thin with a complex cross section to grind. In addition to this it has plunge cuts at the shoulders which forced me to get creative when grinding the blade. The original had traces of silver on the guard so when I decided to make a sister sword I knew that I was going to have to teach myself how to do overlay, and sample after sample, I found a method that seemed to work. Once I got started on the actual parts I was challenged as to how to hold the pieces, and how to work on a complex surface.

 

Lastly this piece, was a lot about release and accepting the changes that I am going through. I have demonstrated in the past that I am capable of clean and exact work, but to me the sword is a very organic object and should show traces of the handmade elements. I didn't want any part of the sword to come across as sloppy, but I also didn't want to fuss over every single detail and imperfection. I let the intuitive process take over and am pleased with the results.

 

The only factor that I am mulling over is possibly doing some aging to the blade to give it a similar feel as the one I get from the hilt. I am still letting the results ferment in my mind since freshly completed projects tend to have hundreds of hours of focus and it is good to break the thought process and revisit it.

 

I hope you enjoy!

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Damn! That's amazing, Michael. The grind is impeccable on a very difficult cross-section. I'd love to learn a bit about the technique you used to achieve it.

 

I've never seen the vertical bars on a wire-wrapped grip before. It adds a three dimensionality to the grip that I find very beautiful.

 

As for the "imperfections" you mention: No one can look at the various elements of this sword and not immediately conclude that the smith that made it was in complete control of the end state (i.e. it's clear that whatever you see, it was done on purpose).

 

Masterful bud.

 

--Dave

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Beautiful Michael, simply beautiful.

 

Please don't age the blade, just my opinion, but it will gain all the colour and patina on it's own soon enough.

A sword this nice will have a great life, it'll show it honestly as time goes by.

 

Great work man.

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I've been staring at this for a while and I think the monochromatic aesthetic is what really grabbed me. I don't see something like that very often, much less all the interesting parts of the whole. I love the overlaid bars across the wire wrap, and they have just the right amount of ornamentation. Outstanding work!

 

John

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I saw you working at Axe 'N' Sax and figured you were up to something big. However, "big" is insufficient to describe your work here. Grand! Momentous! Awesome! Way better. That is a terrific sword. First class all the way, high degree of fit and finish, obviously good design and balance, and when all is said and done - still a perfectly functional, perhaps even a bit utilitarian, tool. You have captured the aesthetic of "sword" perfectly, IMHO.

 

 

I have demonstrated in the past that I am capable of clean and exact work, but to me the sword is a very organic object and should show traces of the handmade elements. I didn't want any part of the sword to come across as sloppy, but I also didn't want to fuss over every single detail and imperfection. I let the intuitive process take over and am pleased with the results.

 

There are some peoples work. Increadible, technical, work and awesome pieces that are so sterile and cold... Work like this is what really catches my eye because, it is not absent all of the little touches that show it was made by a person. That is probably why I am with Randal on aging the blade, let it be... It will get there all on its own.

 

Not to be unappreciate but, there is something lacking. Where is the sheath?

 

~Bruce~

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there be a lot going on in those pictures, im still wrapping my mind around the wire wrap....

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Michael, that is a damn fine sword. The whole thing has come together quite nicely. really appreciate how it works as a whole. very cool!

kc

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Very beautiful! I'm also in the no-aging department. Now looks like a really well-made sword would have looked in the day. Give it a few centuries, and it will start to look old eventually :)

I wonder how many archeological finds are "reproductions" made by the 'old methods' fanboys of the day?

 

Beautiful sword. Just beautiful.

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The longer I look the happier I become. Truly every element brings a smile to my face.

 

It's obvious that everything about this sword has been made with the workmanship of risk. Thanks for making swords Michael.

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Absolutely incredible. That cross section is baffling me. Its perfect.

 

If it means anything...I don't think you should age it either. it almost seems disingenuous to me...especially with something so pure.

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