Jump to content

Sword or Bust


Jim Walker

Recommended Posts

One of the things I have found that has really helped me is to grind not side to side, that is blade perpendicular to the platen of the grinder, but to grind at a sharper angle, with the blade say 30 degrees from the platen. It feels a little odd at first, but you get a lot more surface area on the belt at one time and it helps keep the surface flat.

 

The added benefit is that when you go to use files and sandpaper you can clearly see what grinder marks are left because the are at an angle and you can see them disappear!

 

Ah! I'd never really thought of that but now that you mention it it make a lot of sense! Thanks!

This is what makes sites like this awesome.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstien

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 96
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Looking good! i always draw file everything anyway, it makes it all more perfect. :D

Are you doing the fuller before or after HT?

“If you trust in yourself. . . believe in your dreams. . . and follow your star. . . you will still get beaten by the people who have spent their time working hard and learning things, the people who weren't so lazy.” ~ Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure I'm still doing a fuller. I want to, but I'm not sure how to best go about doing it. I remember seeing a post a while back about making fuller scrapers, but when I tried to make one it didn't really work. I might have made the cutter too big. But if I can I think I want two smaller fullers either side of the ridge.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstien

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this sword looks good with no fuller.

Mark Green

 

I have a way? Is that better then a plan?

(cptn. Mal)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, you may have to play around with the angles and stuff until it finally cuts good. I agree though, fuller or not, the sword looks great!

I just finished forging out the blade for a Geibig type four Viking blade with double fullers (My first sword too, need to make a WIP post) and it was a lot of work, but so far the blade is going well, and the fullering went way better than I thought, even though they're going to kick my butt when I get to cleaning them up, sanding, and polishing.

“If you trust in yourself. . . believe in your dreams. . . and follow your star. . . you will still get beaten by the people who have spent their time working hard and learning things, the people who weren't so lazy.” ~ Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I second Mark!

To become old and wise... You first have to survive being young and foolish! ;) Ikisu.blogsot.com. Email; milesikisu@gmail.com mobile: +27784653651

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

So a bit of an update. I've gotten all of the scale inclusions out of the blade. It's all smooth and straight. However, I have a concern. I'm worried that the sword is still too thick at the spine. How thick is a sword normally going into the quench? This sword tapers from 7.5mm at the base to 4mm at the swell. I feel like this is too thick, but I don't want to make it too thin and then have it go crazy during the quench.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstien

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it depends - a longsword would be around 4 or 5 mm down to 2 or 3 mm, but as there's no real historical precedent for leaf blades this size, I'd just go with what feels right. If you have a belt sander, I'd heat treat from here, and fine tune it after, but if you're doing it all by hand you need to get pretty close to finished dimensions before h-t. No matter what you do, something this long will warp in the quench - straightening is all part of the process, and it's actually easier to straighten a thin blade, but on the other hand, you can't fix a thin blade by grinding...

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Judging by how long it took to get the stock removal done pre HT, I'd keep going until I got to about 5-6mm at the base, and 2-3mm at the end. Everything is way harder after HT.

Edit to add: What is the weight on the blade? Probably about three or four pounds?

Edited by Collin Miller

“If you trust in yourself. . . believe in your dreams. . . and follow your star. . . you will still get beaten by the people who have spent their time working hard and learning things, the people who weren't so lazy.” ~ Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really it took so long because of my robotics team. Our competition gives us six weeks to build a 120 pound robot, so for the past six weeks life has really been pretty busy. but we're done with the build now, so I've got some more time on my hands again. =) As I recall the blade is a little under 3 pounds.

 

I think this is sound advice, and if I'll get warping either way, Id much rather try to straighten a thinner blade. Thanks guys!

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstien

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you sure it weighs that much? How long is it?

 

My finished swords have weighed about 2 or 2 and a bit with fittings and scabbard.

 

Not a bad thing as it looks like it may be pretty long, just curious!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't weighed it on an accurate scale, closest I could get was "below three pounds." It's not exactly something I could walk into the post office and plop down on the scale. =P The blade is 33.5 inches long, though, and quite wide.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstien

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, You're fine! It's always good to get more information rather than to assume.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstien

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, thank you. I had forgotten, but went back and read back through. Thank you.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstien

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I have it polished down to 120 grit. Now I need to see about putting together a quenching set-up... And a sword forge....hmmm...

In one of the photos you can see some ripples... -_-

IMG_2713.JPG

IMG_2712.JPG

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstien

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cool!

“If you trust in yourself. . . believe in your dreams. . . and follow your star. . . you will still get beaten by the people who have spent their time working hard and learning things, the people who weren't so lazy.” ~ Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks guys! It's always nice to hear that you did a decent job at something.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. - Albert Einstien

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...