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A quick for a friend


Kip Kaiser

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This is one I put together for a friend.

The blade is clay quenched bow saw and the handle is walnut. Oal 7 1/4"

Thanks for looking

 

Kip

grayson's 001.JPG

grayson's 002.JPG

A man is no better than his word! Check out the web site @ www.thekaisercustomknives.com

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Nicely done Kip! My question is the same as Isaac's...

To become old and wise... You first have to survive being young and foolish! ;) Ikisu.blogsot.com. Email; milesikisu@gmail.com mobile: +27784653651

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That is a great knife. Any chance you could give a quick tell about your heat treating method. nice activity.

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The steel I used is just a single layer cut from a two man saw I have always called it a bow saw (not sure why). The blade for the most part is stock removal with a clay quench, they always produce a good temper line as well as a good durable blade. Thanks for the comments.

 

Kip

A man is no better than his word! Check out the web site @ www.thekaisercustomknives.com

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That is a great knife. Any chance you could give a quick tell about your heat treating method. nice activity.

Hey John

 

I use Rutlands furnace cement let it dry for a day. Then heat to non magnetic and quench in room temp canola oil. Good luck

A man is no better than his word! Check out the web site @ www.thekaisercustomknives.com

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Nice look to that one Kip, but why no pic of the point of the blade???? Is it a drop point? I made all my first knives out of a two man saw.

 

I was told by a veteran knife maker that they would probably not harden to much harder than the original steel so I did not anneal or re-temper. My biggest problem was getting holes drilled in them, the steel in its original state is extremely hard! It would dull a bit drilling one hole.

 

They ended up making some fine knives. The edge was hard enough to hold an edge and when it did begin to dull down, not too hard as to make it hard to refresh the edge.

 

One knife I made a man bought for his Grandson and when I finished the final edge it was so sharp it was like a razor blade. I used the Lansky sharping method to put the edge on it! When I sent it too him, I sent it with a warning, that if the Grandson wasn't real good with a knife he needed to be extra careful. The man emailed me when he got the knife and said he thought that was probably one of the sharpest knives he had ever seen.

 

I am assuming by the post you annealed and then re-tempered. Would care to share your process on this??

 

I have always said if I made any more out of a two man saw like that I would anneal and then re-temper. At the time I made the first ones I was just getting started and didn't have a quality quench oil and was afraid of screwing it up using ATF as quench!

 

Real nice knife you made there Kip! 2thumbs.gif

Edited by C Craft

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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Kip,

Great looking user. One of the things I love most about knife making is being able to give new life to steel. Nice work.

 

Wade

Wade

Jos et löydä rauhaa itsestämme on turhaa etsiä sitä muualta.

If you can not find peace within yourself, it is useless to look elsewhere.

Visit my website http://www.wadesknives.com

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Ah the 'pit saw' as I know it from the knysna timber trade of years gone by...

I had two in nearly new condition, and they made my first knives! Great steel, 1st I didn't anneal, and struggled! Never had one warp or crack during ht, can't find them anymore as they're poplular wall hanging antiques now! (Pit because one stood on the log the other beneath to cut planks!) 'Doing it the hard way!' Neat work there Kip, it'll hold it's edge well as they didn't use saws that had to be sharpened often...

-Miles-

Edited by Miles Hebbard

To become old and wise... You first have to survive being young and foolish! ;) Ikisu.blogsot.com. Email; milesikisu@gmail.com mobile: +27784653651

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thanks, I need to try a different brand of furnace cement. I attempted clay hardening with refractory cement on some 1095, but it cracked off of one side completely and lifted slighty off the other. I let it dry over night and cured it in the flames breathing out the door of the forge, but it still didnt work. im going to try doing it with wet cement or I heard some people wire wrap thier blades first. I seen a bow saw hanging on the wall at the pawn shop, maybe I can convince the owner to sell...

Edited by John C. Lewicki
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