Jump to content

First attempt to forge brass


Recommended Posts

I got a first commission from a friend of mine, he wants and Irish scian im doing lots of research but to little avail. One of the things i want to do on this is to use a little bit of brass. I was thinking about using a 3 pound brass hammer from a hardware store but ive never worked with it before so i have some questions. 1 being how will this behave when forged do i need my gas forge set to lower temps does it move easy or tough. 2 would that cheap brass hammer be any good or is it a poor quality alloy. And 3 would it be better to just buy brass stock or sheets. if it is ok to forge the brass hammer down what are some pointers and any points in any better easier directions that might save me some headache?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Brass is not expensive. Working with brass you get from a knife supplier will more than likely turn out better than try to wing it with a brass hammer. I have heated brass in my forge to aneal it without any problems before but, it's better to be cautious than sorry.

Edited by GBrackett
Link to post
Share on other sites

And for most non ferrous you can work it cold, just anneal it every once in a while.heating to cherry then quenching in watever does the trick.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't forge bronze, at least not tin-bronze. It will crumble to bits if hotworked. Some brasses will forge, but no guarantee. Mind that the temperatures have to be quite low, about 600C or so. You won't get much zinc fumes at that point. The boiling point is 907C, which is why things get nasty when you melt and cast it as the zinc boils off into toxic fumes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeroen, I wasn't talking about hot forging bronze. I was speaking of cold working with annealing in between. Annealing brass isn't so easy because of zinc's boiling temp (you can't really do it by eye--GBrackett's advice is good that it's a chancy operation) and because a lot of zinc alloys aren't forgable at all. How would you recommend a beginner keep 600c without a pyrometer or fixed temp in a furnace? I feel like bronze of any kind would be easier to work for a beginner.

Edited by Tyler Miller
Link to post
Share on other sites

wow didnt expect to get so many helpful replies so quick well seem i shall indeed just get some stock and do some serious filing. i know that working on a knife you typically work the blade first then the fit and finish part last but i felt like working backwards had good luck with that so here is a pic of the antler stained light buffed.

140317_0004.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...