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Geoff Keyes

No flux no oil welding

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Geoff, actually many blacksmiths do dry weld in coal fires. Mark Aspery does not use flux and many blacksmiths in the UK do also. Mark has demonstrated this and teaches it. He says, "Just keep it clean." Check out his youtube videos.

 

X2 on that

 

cept no one welds in a coal fire... you turn it into coke, firstly, and then you can weld ( just being abit picky here )

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X2 on that

 

cept no one welds in a coal fire... you turn it into coke, firstly, and then you can weld ( just being abit picky here )

Except you can. If you use anthracite, there's no coking. And yes, I've done it without flux. However having said that, the idea of gas forge Damascus without flux is quite exciting.

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As I believe was mentioned in the earlier thread, this fluxless welding in a gas forge and that done in a solid fuel forge are very different things.

The latter does require a good grasp of fire control to avoid "sparkling", which is never good or necessary, even with mild or wrought.

Edited by Dan P.

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Except you can. If you use anthracite, there's no coking. And yes, I've done it without flux. However having said that, the idea of gas forge Damascus without flux is quite exciting.

 

now that is something that i've never gotten my hands on .. anthracite ..... very cool to hear !

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Hard to work with, I only did it because it was said you couldn't forge weld in it.

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Does anyone have any feelings on not removing all the rust/mill scale? My last few forge welds (like a poker and a recent hatchet, all done in a solid fuel fire) I have not been doing that and it doesnt seem to be an issue (but I still use flux). Is that less of an issue on some alloys then others? Also why is it Ive been having an easier time welding in a solid fuel fire (using coal/charcoal or wood) than a gas forge (even if I can still melt steel in the gas forge and the atmosphere is right)? sorry for the thread jack but this seemed a good place to ask without a new thread.

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Gregory, in a solid fuel fire, you will usually be getting it hot enough so that the scale (and/or the surface of the steel) will become liquid, so removal of scale should not be necessary. On the occasion of using a lower heat for welding, a flux with a degree of corrosiveness (borax with or without some of the more aggressive additives) will be needed.

 

Concerning the ease or otherwise with which one welds in a gas or solid fuel forge, that boils down to experience and preference.

However, the process being described in this thread is a bit different from either solid fuel welding or its gas forge analogue.

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Thats true. For the longest time it seemed easier to weld in gas. I think ill leave the fluxless welding to smarter people than I.

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And just so ya'll know, Darryl Meier was welding with every possible method - fluxless, kerosene, etc., etc. - in the early 80s.

I was told this directly about a month ago by Jerry Rados, who learned from Darryl 30 years ago.

There are few things we do today in the forge that haven't already been done.

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Be that as it may, there are many new smiths that are learning these things for the first time. Myself included, and all the issues old and new need to be talked about so the skills are passed on.

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Karl, I actually watched Darryl Meier do it at the Metal Museum back in the late 90s'. He welded at a very low heat too. I've done a lot of dry welding over the years, but mostly with closed welds. Hard to stop using flux with open welds, but I might revist this...

Edited by Don Hanson

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