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New Katana with Shirasaya


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Here's a katana I completed recently.  It's a hira-zukuri (ridgeless) blade forged from W2.  Blade length is 27 or 28 inches and included a shirasaya.

 

hamacher (6 of 15) small.jpg hamacher (7 of 15) small.jpg hamacher (9 of 15) small.jpg hamacher (15 of 15) small.jpg

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Beautiful Blade Walter, The Activity on the the blade is alive and stunning. Also I sent you a PM .

 

Blessings and Best Regards

 

Ret, Sgt. Robert D. Yates

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walter, very nice work. I love to see the hamons you get with w2.

kc

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nice turnback...and a little tobiyaki on the ura!

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Walter I really like your work, thanks for the youtube videos I have been enjoying them.

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Walter - you shared so much of your technique in all of the videos, both free and paid. I really appreciate it, since so much transfers to daos and such. I realize I probably already know the answer to this, but just to be sure... what did you quench the blade in?

 

I have been beset by a number of quite intelligent and well-meaning people who want to convince me that only quench oil can be used. I don't want to start any arguments. Especially not on your thread with this fine sword. I just want to know whether you got those particular results with water or a formulated quenchant.

 

thanks for sharing so much technique (I actually bought a mill that is the Bolton Tools version of the one you showed in your video, and oh man, I wonder how I ever did anything without it).

 

kc

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Hey Kevin,

 

Yeah, aren't mills beautiful?

 

Anyway, as to your question: I quench into water for about 4 to 5 seconds -- basically until I get the curvature I want -- then go immediately into 300 degree Fahrenheit oil. This seems to prevent cracking (mostly), but still gives me the kind of hamons I'm looking for. If you look at the quench curve for Park's 50, they say it mimics water down to the martensite start range...but the fact is that it's slower. Not a lot but a little. I've never used Parks, so I can't say that it wouldn't give me what I'm looking for in a hamon. But I will say that nobody that I know of gets hamons that look quite like mine. That's neither here nor there, except in the sense that I know I can get what I'm looking for by doing it the way that I do it. Everybody lays on their clay in their own way, and heats the blade in their own way with their own equipment, and takes their own approach to normalizing and tempering and so on. Any of these variables can and will effect the end result. Which is great. We should all aim for our blades to be distinctive and personal. All I can say with any certainty is that when everything goes right, the method I use gives me results that seem (relatively) close to those found on traditionally made Japanese blades with choji hamons...which is what I'm aiming for. And I don't crack many blades. So that's why I stick with it.

 

I will make a general point about the well-meaning folks you speak of. The internet is stuffed to the gills with people who will tell you that they know the right answer to every question, right up to meaning of life. My experience is that there are very few interesting questions that only have one right answer. If there's more than one reasonable answer to the question of what the meaning of life is, then surely there's more than one way to get a squiggly line on a knife.

 

Thus endeth the sermon.

 

 

Walter - you shared so much of your technique in all of the videos, both free and paid. I really appreciate it, since so much transfers to daos and such. I realize I probably already know the answer to this, but just to be sure... what did you quench the blade in?

 

I have been beset by a number of quite intelligent and well-meaning people who want to convince me that only quench oil can be used. I don't want to start any arguments. Especially not on your thread with this fine sword. I just want to know whether you got those particular results with water or a formulated quenchant.

 

thanks for sharing so much technique (I actually bought a mill that is the Bolton Tools version of the one you showed in your video, and oh man, I wonder how I ever did anything without it).

 

kc

Edited by Walter Sorrells
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Aha! Another interrupted quench into oil user! After my previous cracked up waki, i will move onto the interupt. Ive employed it before on tanto with success.

 

Good question Kevin, and thanks a lot for the answer Walter.

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"If there's more than one reasonable answer to the question of what the
meaning of life is, then surely there's more than one way to get a
squiggly line on a knife."

Walter Sorrells 5/16/14

 

 

I might have to change my signature phrase!

 

PS Beautiful blade as always and kind of makes me think of doing some water quenches again

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thanks for the answer.

I have been using water into oil for a few years with hamons, too. (or shuangxue, which is Chinese for, "snow crystals," but just another way of saying the same thing.).

 

Never tried heating the oil, though. I would need another tube.

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Great answer Walter.

 

I have set myself up to do the water into the 300F oil then bring the oil up to 400F for tempering. I did my last katana that way and will be sticking with that method.

 

Which video has the mill in it? I have the whole set and don't remember seeing the mill.

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The mill is probably in one of my videos on Youtube.

 

 

Great answer Walter.

 

I have set myself up to do the water into the 300F oil then bring the oil up to 400F for tempering. I did my last katana that way and will be sticking with that method.

 

Which video has the mill in it? I have the whole set and don't remember seeing the mill.

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