Jump to content
Ondřej Borský

Carolingian Seax WIP

Recommended Posts

Good day gentlemen!

The upcoming state exams have been taking most of my time, but I have sneaked to my workshop every now and then. This is a wedding gift for one of my friends, an archaeologist. He likes Carolingian culture, and so I tried to produce something in that manner - the blade shape is taken from the late 8th century examples, and the floral motive belongs to the 9th. The grip is oak - bog oak and oak to be specific... I thought that him, being an archaeologist, would appreciate the spacers made of the old wood. The rest of thee grip is normal oak, and for me, I must admit it was difficult to carve it. Of course, I am a beginner at carving, so everything is difficult for me :). The blade is W1 (or W2? can´t remember), and it was hardened in HT company. I told them to quench it in oil, but now, they new better :angry: So the blade is hardened through and through, not just the edge. I couldn´t scrape the lines, so I made a chisel and chiseled them... bloody work, if you ask me :D .

Right now, the handle is about to be glued together, the blade polished, and then everything assembled... and then the sheath

IMG_0013 (1280x960).jpg

IMG_0014 (1280x960).jpg

IMG_0015 (1280x960).jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks like it will be a special piece! Always nice to make something as a gift!

Oak has a coarse grain, likes to chip out! Finer grained wood is beter for carving! I'm useless at it still but my aunt was very skillful at carving, I miss her now!

Edited by Miles Hebbard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a really beautiful package! Looks very much like an ancient find, I'm sure your friend will love it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love it....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

first, that will be a wonderful gift. Gifts are the best sort of knives.

 

or knives are the best sort of gifts. whatever.

 

anyway, the carving looks good. the blade looks great, and the overall piece is well done. I like it. It has a quality that makes it look right, and not like something mass produced or modern or tactical. (I hate tactical, and even more, I hate the names that people come up with as marketing gimmicks- the kill, kill, death, destroy, anti-genocidal, thermonuclear, war-ender type names, and you look and you have a 4-inch-knife with a crappy handle that is too thick to cut and a chisel grind. forgive the rant).

 

what I am saying is, I really like your historically-inspired work, and your friendly spirit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As kevin said...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Kevin, Miles, George, Emiliano and Eli, for the kinds words! I agree with what Kevin said about the modern tactical stuff... it is just so cold and spiritless, soul-lacking... Originally I wanted to make a butt-welded blade for this one, as it would make it another tiny bit more real in a way of historical construction method, but during the second welding pass, I lost concentration for a minute, and the tool steel edge burnt a little just in the middle of the blade :) hmpf...

Well, I did not have enough time to make another welded blade, and so I went with what I got... the interesting part is that even though the blade is fully hardened through and through, when I polished it to 400 grit and looked against the light, I could see hamon... or were my eyes just playing tricks on me?

Anyway, of the dye on the sheath is drying, and soon I will post the pictures of the whole thing...

 

Another Carolingian inspired seax is being born in my mind... a tad more complex ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fantastic work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very Nice!
Such a fine gift!
It´s been said, but it makes for the finest blades when made in this spirit.

Really lookng forward to seeing what you come up with next.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Peter and Krateros... the next carolingian seax still needs some crystallizing in the citadel of my mind ;) however, this one is finished, and sheath also. I couldn´t decide between decorating the sheath in a 3D incision-and-tool manner, or simply carving. I have decided for the latter, since I believe it goes better with the grip. Now just to put the belt-straps in and it´s ready to go... oh, btw... the best is 7,5mm thick at the spine :) and the feeling is just lovely!

IMG_0029 (1280x960).jpg

 

IMG_0030 (1280x960).jpg

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice seax, and love seeing it buried in the log :0)

You do awesome work man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the US we have begun calling what you have observed of the heat treatment an, "auto hamon." Meaning, often when one hardens a blade-shaped section of steel that is really shallow hardening, the whole thing doesn't completely harden. It leads to a hamon-like effect. These were also seen on a proportion of original blades that were heat treated. Simple steels and their methods (probably hardened in a fairly slow oil compared to our modern stuff) led to incomplete hardening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Kevin! Oh yes, I do know about the auto-hamon, but I thought that the spine of the blade would then be soft. Yet when I had it measured, it had 47HRc at the spine... as Yoda would say "much to lear you still have, young smithdawan (see what I did there :P ? )...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...