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Hloh

Some museum blades

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Hey!

Last week Richard Van Dijk visited Czech Republic, we had chance to see some beautiful blades at museums.

I took a picture of some.

First part are some excavations from Čáslav, wooden sword was founded under 13th century house doorstep.

 

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Edited by Hloh

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Second was Imperial armory (about 550 pieces of guns, canons, swords, armours,...)

 

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And third, that I enjoy most, was exhibition about baroque applied arts there are great eating sets:

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Really great!!! Thanks a lot... ;)

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Great pictures! Thanks for sharing.

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thank you for posting these! I really like the eating knifes such great filework!

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Hey!

I meet some new beauties:

 

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My favourite one- spring still works!

 

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Nice two handed swords... and I love the musket glaive!

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How did I miss this thread? :blink: Thank you, Hloh, these are seriously cool photos! And yes, that wheel-lock glaive is nifty. B)

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What Alan said... tremendous documentation. I love the eating sets, particularly. Thank you for sharing.

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Hi Hloh, nice pictures. :)
One century ago we would have been in a same country! (Austro-hungary...) That's probably why when I saw your second post in this topic I was 100% sure that they were taken in Graz, Austria. They have a huge arms and armour museum there, same style. Not just general style, I thought I recognized some individual pieces!

 

http://www.museum-joanneum.at/en/styrian-armoury

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Wow! What cool museum documentation!

 

I'm all jazzed to build an eating set now.

 

Well, now that I think about it, I probably shouldn't. If I did I'm sure to embarrass my wife and daughter by bringing it to a nice dinner just to show it off.

 

Grins,

 

Dave

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That is really cool Hloh. I wish Victorinox would put in a pry bar like that. It would have saved me a lot if blade tips over the years.

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Hey!

I have something new, pictures are from top oldest to youngest.

Most knives are form 14-15th century as well as sheats.

Last thing is 18th century alarm clock.

 

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Ohhh, that is incredibly similar to a sword in the collection of the National Museum of Antiquities in Leiden, Netherlands. Briefly I thought it was the one. I know these swords have often a lot of similarity in design and decoration. But it doesn't happen often that they are that identical. Same maker perhaps?

 

PERSFOTO_Zwaard_van_Buggenum_Collectie_en_foto_Rijksmuseum_van_Oudheden_3.jpg

 

Edit: after posting I do notice the difference in number of "rings" in the grip, 3 vs 4. That's quite odd, as that means both swords seem to have been held differently, one with 4 fingers on the grip, and the first with three on the grip, one on the shoulders or with one on the

Edited by Jeroen Zuiderwijk

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About number of rings on the grip: I do not think this is an indication of number of fingers grasping the grip. It may be, but you find more or less rings than is needed to separate the fingers not only on bronze age swords, but also in later periods. The rings do add "gription" and friction to increase tactile feedback, but not always by "locking" the fingers of the hand down in grooves.

The two swords are really very similar to each other in both form and decoration and style of making. One of those cases where you wonder if they come from the sam workshop.

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