Jump to content

My first blade, and its a sword.... thing.


Einar
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is my first hardened and sharpened blade. I've made a few practice blades of mild steel before, but I recently bought a gas forge so this is the first time I've been able to harden and make a sharp one.

 

rqxmk8.jpg

 

11ln693.jpg

 

s43s01.jpg

 

f0ddw1.jpg

 

2cntqw4.jpg

I wanted to make a sword of some kind, and I decided to go as simple as possible, just a short saber with a simple hilt. There is no profile taper or distal taper, again to keep things simple for my first time. Its all stock removal, just using a 5" angle grinder, files and sandpaper. Blade crossection is flat ground V shape with a secondary bevel for the edge, though I tried to blend the edge to an appleseed shape. Triple normalised and quenched in warm water. The blade was completely straight before the quench and took on a mild curve as expected. Very happy and relieved that it didnt crack. Read a lot of threads about heat treating on this forum before attempting to harden it, so thanks to all the people who share their knowledge here, its a huge help for a beginner like me.

 

It took a set to the right after quenching but I was able to bend it back during the tempering cycles, which was nerve wracking. Its not completely straight, there is still a very mild "S" shaped bend in the blade that can be seen if you squint down the back of the blade, but I thought I had pushed my luck far enough and didnt want to bend the blade any more.

 

Its made from unknown spring steel. Total length is 65 cm. The blade itself is 49 cm. 25 mm wide and 5 mm thick. Balance point about 4 inches from the "guard". I dont have any scales so i dont know what the weight is.

 

The hilt has two simple steel plates at each end of a birch core, with a thin leather grip glued over it. I tried following Peter Johnssons tutorial on grip wrapping, which was a great help. The grip looks completely round in some of the pics, but thats a trick of the light. It is oval and a bit thinner at the bottom than the top.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cool! If your temper was good you can counterbend it to get it 99 percent straight, 3 rods (brass tube is good) and a vice is all you need, even hard wood dowels will work! Congrats on a job well done! As above, make more!

To become old and wise... You first have to survive being young and foolish! ;) Ikisu.blogsot.com. Email; milesikisu@gmail.com mobile: +27784653651

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind words everyone :) Already thinking about my next project.

 

Miles, thank you, I'll try the vice trick next time. It took a scary amount of force to correct the bend by hand.

 

Randal, are there pics of your first one online? Would be fun to see it :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not online, I have been looking for the hardcopy print of it to show you actually but can't seem to track it down yet...i used a birch handle

And a couple of fittings another guy made, but pretty much the same sword. Well, honestly, yours is nicer. :0)

 

I'll keep looking, see if I can find it...it was a long, long time ago, as long as 25-27 years now maybe.

 

Here is my second one though, in the japanese style anyway, i got into euro swords before this one, but got a lot of help and encouragement from other guys who knew way more than me and it pushed me forward an incredible amount, much like what you are getting from the fantastic craftsmen here. Maybe it'll inspire you and drive you forward, I'd like to see you do more after such a fine beginning!

This one was about a year later, so still something like 25 years ago.

image.jpg

Randal

www.rhgraham.simpl.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not online, I have been looking for the hardcopy print of it to show you actually but can't seem to track it down yet...i used a birch handle

And a couple of fittings another guy made, but pretty much the same sword. Well, honestly, yours is nicer. :0)

 

I'll keep looking, see if I can find it...it was a long, long time ago, as long as 25-27 years now maybe.

 

Here is my second one though, in the japanese style anyway, i got into euro swords before this one, but got a lot of help and encouragement from other guys who knew way more than me and it pushed me forward an incredible amount, much like what you are getting from the fantastic craftsmen here. Maybe it'll inspire you and drive you forward, I'd like to see you do more after such a fine beginning!

This one was about a year later, so still something like 25 years ago.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

I'd be chuffed to bits if my second one looks as nice as that. Definately inspiring, thank you, Randall. I'm thinking about a messer, falchion or seax as my next one. I want to get into straight double edged european swords, but I think I'll make a few curved single edged ones first, so i can learn a bit about how the steel behaves in heat treatment. Sabering a double edged blade thats supposed to be straight would be pretty demotivating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found it, feel like I'm kinda hijacking the thread though.

It's a picture of a picture, and a poor one at that, but it gets the idea across...i didn't know anything and was just figuring it out as I went.

Steel was recylcled from L-6 saw blades and forged out by hand, when I was younger, way stronger, and a whole lot dumber.

( if that is possible)

 

I'd probably trade two of mine for yours :0)

image.jpg

Randal

www.rhgraham.simpl.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found it, feel like I'm kinda hijacking the thread though.

It's a picture of a picture, and a poor one at that, but it gets the idea across...i didn't know anything and was just figuring it out as I went.

Steel was recylcled from L-6 saw blades and forged out by hand, when I was younger, way stronger, and a whole lot dumber.

( if that is possible)

 

I'd probably trade two of mine for yours :0)

 

Not at all hijacking, I really appreciate it.

 

That looks bigger than mine. I was a bit too scared of messing things up to attempt a full size sword for my first time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Truthfully, i never had too much difficulty with the double edged stuff, it's mainly a matter of focus and care going into the quench, and sabering, at least for me, was rarely a big issue. Although, warps are always an issue.

I just pound them out straight...i figured if they survived the quench and temper,mand were done right up to that point, they should survive straightening too and the odd one that broke straightening, well, they just were not good enough and that was the proof.

Randal

www.rhgraham.simpl.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One more thing, if I may, please don't sell it, keep that one.

There is a whole bunch of firsts,that I was stupid to have sold, and to this day I do not own one of my own swords.

I feel great regret over that. I don't have my first knife either.

 

I told you I was dumb..

:0)

Randal

www.rhgraham.simpl.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the odd one that broke straightening, well, they just were not good enough and that was the proof.

 

Thats a good way of looking at it.

 

And yeah, I'll be keeping it. :) I dont really have an ambition of selling the stuff that I will make. I want to make blades that I like, for myself first and foremost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well done. Be careful quenching leaf springs in water, some of them may surprise you and not in a good way.

 

Still, it's a good feeling, isn't it?

 

Thank you, Alan. A wonderful feeling, yes. The joy of creating.

 

Its not made from a leaf spring, its made from one of the blades of one of these things (I have no idea what theyre called in english. A fairly common winter transportation thingy in scandinavia.

 

23011_jpg.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great job. Congrats!!

Mark Green

 

I have a way? Is that better then a plan?

(cptn. Mal)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great start.

I appreciate how you worked with the limitations you set up for yourself in regards to making,. design and materials coming up with an attractive design. This is what I think is the best part of what you have done.
-And I say that even though the sword itself and the attention of detail that you have accomplished is really good.

 

Keep up the good work! Really looking forward to seeing what you do next.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, Mark and Peter.

 

It wont take too long before I post my next blade. I've been hard at work all day and have a big broken back seax tempering in the kitchen oven as I write this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome sword-thing!

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

RelicForge on facebook
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...