Jump to content

Broken-Back Seax


Mike Lake
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone,

 

This is my first post to the forums.

I wanted to show my latest project, it's my second fully complete knife.

 

OAL is 9.75"

Blade length is 5.75"

 

It's forged from 1084, and the handle is carved from myrtle wood with an oak spacer and iron pommel.

 

knife1.jpg

 

knife2.jpg

 

knife3.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cool, and welcome Mike, hope we see more of your work!

To become old and wise... You first have to survive being young and foolish! ;) Ikisu.blogsot.com. Email; milesikisu@gmail.com mobile: +27784653651

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well done Mike, I would be proud to have made that. I love the strong lines throughout

I have always thought that one man of tolerable abilities may work great changes, and accomplish great affairs among mankind, if he first forms a good plan....

- Benjamin Franklin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good job! One thing to remember on seaxes though is there are absolutely no straight lines on blade profile. Looks really nice other than that though!

“If you trust in yourself. . . believe in your dreams. . . and follow your star. . . you will still get beaten by the people who have spent their time working hard and learning things, the people who weren't so lazy.” ~ Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey that looks great! For a second knife that's something to really be proud of.

 

I realize this isn't a reproduction, but even for a seax-inspired blade It does look a bit too blocky to me. As suggested, I'd add a bit more angle to the point and a bit of a curve to the cutting edge.

 

Nice fit and finish, however. Consider using the same material for the bolster and pommel next time.

 

Welcome! Luck in the quest!

 

Dave

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey that looks great! For a second knife that's something to really be proud of.

 

I realize this isn't a reproduction, but even for a seax-inspired blade It does look a bit too blocky to me. As suggested, I'd add a bit more angle to the point and a bit of a curve to the cutting edge.

 

Nice fit and finish, however. Consider using the same material for the bolster and pommel next time.

 

Welcome! Luck in the quest!

 

Dave

I am in full agreement with Dave. The fit and finish are very nice, but the blade shape... I think it was Piccasso who said you need to learn the rules in order to break them (or maybe it was Dali)... I'd suggest studying seaxes, not reproductions but the original artifacts, find out what make a seax tick, what makes a seax look like a seax. Then you will be able to go in and make it your own, maintaining the unique qualities of a seax yet putting your own individual twist on it. The craftsmanship displayed with this knife is excellent for your second finished piece...

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

RelicForge on facebook
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...